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Upgrade from GTX 680 to GTX 1060 without changing remaining hardware

Hi Guys,
while I originally planned to fully upgrade my computer, I decided to wait longer and save up some money for a good 4K system "at some point in the future". Until then, I wanted to have a way to keep playing games at full HD and max settings so I thought about only upgrading my graphics card and for now keep the rest the way it is.
My current setup has:
  • Intel Core i7 3770
  • ASUS GTX 680 DC2O
  • 16GB RAM
  • bequiet! Straight Power E9 580W CM


As I had little performance issues playing Witcher 2 or Tomb Raider (2013) on full max settings at full HD, I thought of upgrading to ASUS Strix GTX 1060 O6G. Do you think my CPU will be a highly limiting factor here? So far I never really had performance issues related to CPU, so I think it should be alright, but just like to ask for a couple more opinions.
Thanks in advance,
Phil
7 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about upgrade gtx 680 gtx 1060 changing remaining hardware
  1. "580W Power Supply" is basically like saying "FIRE HAZARD", since most decent power supplies are either 550 or 650W, or in the rare case of a seasonic XP2, 520W or 660W

    Unless you know the exact model of power supply, it's time for an upgrade. Recommended units are EVGA G2 550, Corsair RM550x, XFX TS Gold 550, and Seasonic G550


    Other than that it's a perfectly good system
  2. basroil said:
    "580W Power Supply" is basically like saying "FIRE HAZARD", since most decent power supplies are either 550 or 650W, or in the rare case of a seasonic XP2, 520W or 660W

    Unless you know the exact model of power supply, it's time for an upgrade. Recommended units are EVGA G2 550, Corsair RM550x, XFX TS Gold 550, and Seasonic G550


    Other than that it's a perfectly good system


    Thanks for the answer. I didn't want to specify, because I just included it to show that it's enough (as the GTX 1060 uses less than the 680 anyway). But for reference, its a bequiet! Straight Power E9 580W, hope that is decent enough (;
  3. phil13131 said:

    Thanks for the answer. I didn't want to specify, because I just included it to show that it's enough (as the GTX 1060 uses less than the 680 anyway). But for reference, its a bequiet! Straight Power E9 580W, hope that is decent enough (;


    Wattage is almost never an issue, it's quality!

    Unfortunately that PSU is now 5 years old and never had proper reviews, so no way of knowing if it will work properly. You can try it out, but if you run into problems (sudden shutdowns) or you hear coil whine, replace it with something on the above list.
  4. basroil said:
    phil13131 said:

    Thanks for the answer. I didn't want to specify, because I just included it to show that it's enough (as the GTX 1060 uses less than the 680 anyway). But for reference, its a bequiet! Straight Power E9 580W, hope that is decent enough (;


    Wattage is almost never an issue, it's quality!

    Unfortunately that PSU is now 5 years old and never had proper reviews, so no way of knowing if it will work properly. You can try it out, but if you run into problems (sudden shutdowns) or you hear coil whine, replace it with something on the above list.


    Well with that I have to strongly disagree. That power supply has tons of reviews and was at the time when I bought it by far the most recommended one.
  5. Best answer
    phil13131 said:

    Well with that I have to strongly disagree. That power supply has tons of reviews and was at the time when I bought it by far the most recommended one.


    None of those tested transients, which maxwell and pascal cards have in spades. There's also no Haswell compatibility testing, etc. Like I said, not a single PROPER review, at least not for modern computing.

    While it may not seem like it, the way computers work has changed more in the last 3 years than it had in the 15 before that. Whereas old chips would take a second or two to adjust clock speeds, the new ones do it in milliseconds, and with that you get huge jumps in power draw (transients). Just because the PSU was great 5 years ago doesn't mean it's not garbage for new parts... that also doesn't mean it's bad, hence my suggestion that you try it out and only upgrade if you see signs that the power supply isn't cut out for your equipment. The 960/1060 is borderline in terms of stress on old components, usually it will work even on poorer supplies. (970/1070/980/1080/980ti are definitely much more picky about PSU quality, I've personally seen a middle of the line PSU with great ripple and 650W get completely destroyed by just two weeks with a 970!)
  6. basroil said:
    phil13131 said:

    Well with that I have to strongly disagree. That power supply has tons of reviews and was at the time when I bought it by far the most recommended one.


    None of those tested transients, which maxwell and pascal cards have in spades. There's also no Haswell compatibility testing, etc. Like I said, not a single PROPER review, at least not for modern computing.

    While it may not seem like it, the way computers work has changed more in the last 3 years than it had in the 15 before that. Whereas old chips would take a second or two to adjust clock speeds, the new ones do it in milliseconds, and with that you get huge jumps in power draw (transients). Just because the PSU was great 5 years ago doesn't mean it's not garbage for new parts... that also doesn't mean it's bad, hence my suggestion that you try it out and only upgrade if you see signs that the power supply isn't cut out for your equipment. The 960/1060 is borderline in terms of stress on old components, usually it will work even on poorer supplies. (970/1070/980/1080/980ti are definitely much more picky about PSU quality, I've personally seen a middle of the line PSU with great ripple and 650W get completely destroyed by just two weeks with a 970!)


    Yeah, that might be the best solution. Hope it works fine of course. With the GTX 680, which demands quite a bit more, I have never had any issues thought, so I hope it will be enough! Just bought the card and the rest will be left for the near future then!
  7. phil13131 said:

    Yeah, that might be the best solution. Hope it works fine of course. With the GTX 680, which demands quite a bit more, I have never had any issues thought, so I hope it will be enough! Just bought the card and the rest will be left for the near future then!


    Again, it's not about wattage... In terms of being "demanding", the 1060 is far more so when taking a look beyond just average power draw. There's a lot of misinformation still running around saying nonsense like "if your PSU wattage is good, you're fine" or "low ripple means great power supply", though some places have started to wise up and put things that are more important to modern equipment (transients, holdup time, etc).

    Hopefully that PSU won't need to be replaced, but if it does, now you know what items to replace it with.
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