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No signal after installing MSI GEFORCE GTX 1070 GAMING X 8G Graphics Card

I have a home-built PC. My present system configuration is -

Fx 8350 CPU
Gigabyte 970A DS3 motherboard
Gskill ripjaw 8 gb ram
Cooler master midtower K350
Seasonic 1050w platinum power supply
3 tb internal HDD (1 black and 1 green WD)
samsung syncmaster s23b370


I had a Zotac Nvidia 650ti boost graphics card, which I replaced by a GEFORCE GTX 1070 GAMING X 8G Graphics Card.

As it is a mid tower, i actually had to squeeze the graphics card in. I interchanged my internal hdd to actually create the space. I didn't have DVI-D adapter during the time of installation, so I tried the HDMI port. The monitor showed "No Signal" at that point. After purchasing and installing the DVI-D adapter I am still getting the "No Signal" message. The CPU is running just fine, but the monitor is blank. I am in dire need of your help. Please advice. What are the areas can I troubleshoot?

P.S. I don't have a VGA port on the MoBo...
9 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about signal installing msi geforce gtx 1070 gaming graphics card
  1. How do you know that the CPU is running fine? Just because the fan is spinning doesn't mean that the system is working. Can you hear the computer boot to Windows? Does the HDD LED flash like it's booting? If the answer to these questions is no, then nothing is working but the fans are on. This will require troubleshooting a non-POSTing system. It could be that your motherboard needs a BIOS update to initialize the card correctly. Maybe you forgot to connect the PCI-E power connector. Or your new card could be faulty.

    Now if you are sure it's booting to Windows but you just aren't getting a signal to the monitor, then it could be a couple things. Maybe your monitor isn't Auto detecting the signal and you have to manually switch the input to the HDMI input you are using. It's possible that your HDMI cable is not working. To test these two things, you could try a different HDMI signal sources, such as a DVD / Bluray player. If you get video with another signal source, then you know it's an issue with the card.
  2. Well the first thing to do is check to see if the new 1070 card is fitted flushly to the Pci-e card slot of the motherboard.

    When you fit the card since it is a bit more heavy.
    Lift the card up, and when doing so at the same time tighten the screw from the bracket of the card to the system case.

    Make sure the Pci-e power plug direct from the psu is connected to the GTX 1070 card.

    And that the 24 pin main ATX power block on the motherboard is firmly seated in its socket.
    And make sure you have connected all eight pins of the 12v E-atx or Eps power connector from the psu to the motherboard.

    If you fail to connect the 12v eight pin E-atx or EPS power connector from the psu to the motherboard your new card may not work.
  3. techgeek said:
    How do you know that the CPU is running fine? Just because the fan is spinning doesn't mean that the system is working. Can you hear the computer boot to Windows? Does the HDD LED flash like it's booting? If the answer to these questions is no, then nothing is working but the fans are on. This will require troubleshooting a non-POSTing system. It could be that your motherboard needs a BIOS update to initialize the card correctly. Maybe you forgot to connect the PCI-E power connector. Or your new card could be faulty.

    Now if you are sure it's booting to Windows but you just aren't getting a signal to the monitor, then it could be a couple things. Maybe your monitor isn't Auto detecting the signal and you have to manually switch the input to the HDMI input you are using. It's possible that your HDMI cable is not working. To test these two things, you could try a different HDMI signal sources, such as a DVD / Bluray player. If you get video with another signal source, then you know it's an issue with the card.


    HDD LED flashes when booting. I have a few queries
    1. How do you troubleshooting a non-POSTing system?
    2. How do you manually switch the input to the HDMI input ?
    3. How do update the BIOs?
  4. When I say flashes, I don't mean a few times after you start the computer and then it goes off and stays off. If you computer takes 45 seconds to boot, the HDD LED will flash like crazy that whole time. I have an SSD and even though it only takes like 8 seconds to boot to my login screen, the HDD LED flashed for probably a minute total.

    First off lets skip one until we know if it's actually booting to Windows without a display.

    The answer to two is if your monitor doesn't auto detect a video signal, then you need to manually switch it. This is dependent on the monitor, what make / model of monitor do you have? For instance my monitor can switch inputs via the Menu button.

    Lastly three, again we should leave this until we are sure that your system isn't POSTing.

    Just for clarification, POST stands for Power On Self Test. Generally speaking, if a computer successfully POST's then it will start booting. A failed POST can behave in a few ways. In extreme cases absolutely nothing happens, the fans all come on and nothing happens. In less extreme cases you will get a beep code (with or without a display) that corresponds to where the POST failed. Beep codes are only audible if your case has a speaker. If your motherboard has a POST display (a 2 digit 7 segment display), you will get a hexadecimal number displayed that you can use to find out where the POST is failing.
  5. techgeek said:
    When I say flashes, I don't mean a few times after you start the computer and then it goes off and stays off. If you computer takes 45 seconds to boot, the HDD LED will flash like crazy that whole time. I have an SSD and even though it only takes like 8 seconds to boot to my login screen, the HDD LED flashed for probably a minute total.

    First off lets skip one until we know if it's actually booting to Windows without a display.

    The answer to two is if your monitor doesn't auto detect a video signal, then you need to manually switch it. This is dependent on the monitor, what make / model of monitor do you have? For instance my monitor can switch inputs via the Menu button.

    Lastly three, again we should leave this until we are sure that your system isn't POSTing.

    Just for clarification, POST stands for Power On Self Test. Generally speaking, if a computer successfully POST's then it will start booting. A failed POST can behave in a few ways. In extreme cases absolutely nothing happens, the fans all come on and nothing happens. In less extreme cases you will get a beep code (with or without a display) that corresponds to where the POST failed. Beep codes are only audible if your case has a speaker. If your motherboard has a POST display (a 2 digit 7 segment display), you will get a hexadecimal number displayed that you can use to find out where the POST is failing.

    samsung syncmaster s23b370
  6. Best answer
    OK, well that monitor should auto detect the signal if one is present. It's very similar to mine. Just to be thorough though, with the computer powered up, hit the button on the left side of the Auto button twice. The first time will bring up a small menu, the second will switch the input to the next input. This should force it to cycle through all the available inputs. If it doesn't find a signal, it will stop at a blank screen. At this point you can assume that there is no signal and the computer is not POST'ing.

    If it's not POSTing, try your old graphics card again. Preferably connect the monitor to your old graphics card in the same way (HDMI) as the new one. Does it POST now?
  7. techgeek said:
    When I say flashes, I don't mean a few times after you start the computer and then it goes off and stays off. If you computer takes 45 seconds to boot, the HDD LED will flash like crazy that whole time. I have an SSD and even though it only takes like 8 seconds to boot to my login screen, the HDD LED flashed for probably a minute total.

    First off lets skip one until we know if it's actually booting to Windows without a display.

    The answer to two is if your monitor doesn't auto detect a video signal, then you need to manually switch it. This is dependent on the monitor, what make / model of monitor do you have? For instance my monitor can switch inputs via the Menu button.

    Lastly three, again we should leave this until we are sure that your system isn't POSTing.

    Just for clarification, POST stands for Power On Self Test. Generally speaking, if a computer successfully POST's then it will start booting. A failed POST can behave in a few ways. In extreme cases absolutely nothing happens, the fans all come on and nothing happens. In less extreme cases you will get a beep code (with or without a display) that corresponds to where the POST failed. Beep codes are only audible if your case has a speaker. If your motherboard has a POST display (a 2 digit 7 segment display), you will get a hexadecimal number displayed that you can use to find out where the POST is failing.


    techgeek said:
    OK, well that monitor should auto detect the signal if one is present. It's very similar to mine. Just to be thorough though, with the computer powered up, hit the button on the left side of the Auto button twice. The first time will bring up a small menu, the second will switch the input to the next input. This should force it to cycle through all the available inputs. If it doesn't find a signal, it will stop at a blank screen. At this point you can assume that there is no signal and the computer is not POST'ing.

    If it's not POSTing, try your old graphics card again. Preferably connect the monitor to your old graphics card in the same way (HDMI) as the new one. Does it POST now?


    So Sorry to reply you so late...I did manage to run the graphics card...I reset the CMOS battery and everything worked like magic...It did POST and everything is working fine now...
  8. Excellent, glad to hear you got it sorted out.
  9. techgeek said:
    Excellent, glad to hear you got it sorted out.


    Thank you so much...the whole installation was a nightmarish experience, but in the end it worked out just fine. :)
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