Solved

Passive water cooling setup?

So I'm looking for the best way to make my PC silent (or at least near-silent).
So as the title suggests, I thought about getting a very big aluminum water tank and then use a regular pump that's usually used for regular water cooling.
The idea is, that the large amount of water will be able to absorb the heat from my CPU and GPU and the large aluminum tank would be able to dissipate the heat from the water (and If that won't be enough, I can get those aluminum heatsinks and thermal adhesive)
How much water do I need if I want under 50c for both my overclock CPU and GPU (maybe even 2 GPUs in the future)
And part from that, any Thoughts? Opinions? Ideas?
6 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about passive water cooling setup
  1. Hey its totally possible. A while ago, Zalman had something similar. read:http://techreport.com/review/6860/zalman-reserator-1-fanless-water-cooler

    In fact, my own setup, I run a super thick 360mm rad with just my cpu (~150W TDP) in the loop and I can run it without fans without the CPU overheating. That being said, I do use the fans, not just to get cooler temps, but also because my motherboards VRMs and my ram get SUPER hot and do benefit from the increased airflow in the case.

    As for exact volumes and sizes..... I think you'd need to do some experimentation.
  2. I tried the Zalman Reserator 1 V2 back in 2008. I don't recommend it as is, but custom building something similar might be okay. It made a big mess for me when one of the hoses came loose from the cpu block and leaked into the psu (since I had foolishly left it running unattended). Also, from what I've read, the pump included with that system is pretty weak, so a separate pump might work better. However, with the right fans and a good pump, I imagine a custom watercooling loop could be made nearly silent without needing to be completely passive. I hope you've read the TH watercooling sticky already.
  3. You can build a near silent system with a custom loop - no need for some big tub of water.

    I'm running an mITX build (6700K) overclocked with a 980ti OC with a D5 pump, one 240 mm rad with PWM high static pressure Cougar fans, and one 120 MM rad with a high static pressure Cougar fan. If I didn't have LEDs in the case I wouldn't even know its on. And when it's at load it is barely audible. I'm sure if I was using a larger case with more radiator space it would be totally silent. (My temps are 22c idle, 50-60c while gaming, and 70-75c while at full load on all cores (handbrake).

    Just try to use larger radiators (140mm fans over 120mm fans) rather than thicker (more surface area) so the fans can spin at a slower RPM.
  4. My idea was to put the big aluminum tank outside the computer so the water tank can be very big (24-30 liters) so the temps would be very low. It would also be cheaper than a standard water cooling solution (althrough I don't really know but I assume that a big aluminum tank+ heatsinks would be cheaper than a radiator+fans+reservoir )
    My case is the define S and I was (and still am) considering getting a 360mm rad in the front but I think this solution would be better
  5. I'm in a Define Nano S and I really don't think you need to go through all the trouble of a large passive bucket of water. In your Define S, you can easily throw a 360 on the front and depending on your mobo height another 360 or 420 on top (even using slim fans) and even another 120 on the rear if you really wanted to go crazy. It would be an investment but with all that radiator space, your fans will stay at low speeds and you won't hear a thing. Plus everything is contained in one box. -That's just my opinion.
  6. Best answer
    Rampy216 said:
    My idea was to put the big aluminum tank outside the computer so the water tank can be very big (24-30 liters) so the temps would be very low. It would also be cheaper than a standard water cooling solution (althrough I don't really know but I assume that a big aluminum tank+ heatsinks would be cheaper than a radiator+fans+reservoir )
    My case is the define S and I was (and still am) considering getting a 360mm rad in the front but I think this solution would be better


    Given the amount of aluminum that would be necessary for such a large tank, I am somewhat doubtful it would really be cheaper. Also, think about the simple thermodynamics: a large tank like that has a small surface area inside relative to the volume of water, so the heat transfer to the tank walls would be much less efficient than a radiator, regardless of whether you added heatsink fins on the outside.
Ask a new question