Solved

Should a rusty PC builder like me be allowed to OC an expensive 6700K??

... Well that's not really my question, but now that I have your attention... ;) (sorry)

I've just built a PC with an i7 6700K in the socket of an ASUS Z170 Pro Gaming. The CPU fan is a Phanteks PH-TC14PE (Noctua NH-D14 "wannabe"), and the RAM is 4x8 DDR4 2666MHz.

Now, it's not the first PC I've built, but it's been a while and I'm very rusty when it comes to OCing. Still, I wanted to give it a shot. What I did after my build was finished, was to run the ASUS AI Suite 3 "Dual Intelligent Processors" to automatically calculate the OC values for me. The result I got was a frequency of 4700 MHz and a high 1.4V+ CPU core voltage (can't remember exact value). Boldly I then tested this configuration with Prime95 and used coretemp to monitor the temperatures. I had to hit stop as fast as I could (with a scream) when very quickly the temperatures rose to 99 degrees celcius.

I tweaked the setting manually after that and found that a setting of 4400 Mhz and a voltage of 1.32V would give me stable results: 25 degrees idle and 80 degrees full load (Prime95 small FFTs), reported by coretemp.

So what I'm wondering now is (1), why the heck does AI Suite 3 set OC values that fries my CPU during heavy load? And (2), what about my final results? 4400 Mhz, 1.32V, 25-80 degrees, given the mobo, CPU and fan specified above, is that decent or does it suck (ie should I reinstall the CPU fan for the hope of better results)?

I'm very grateful for any input! And please excuse my ignorance!
4 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about rusty builder allowed expensive 6700k
  1. Best answer
    1) Because it doesn't magically know what CPU cooling you have. For all it knows you could be running phase-change cooling.

    2) 4.4GHz on a 6700k is waaay too conservative and 1.32V way too high for that clockspeed. Lower the voltage more or increase clockspeed, you should be stable at 4.6-4.8GHz with 1.3-1.35V. You won't get better results from reinstalling the cooler. 1.4V on any modern CPU is only sustainable with custom watercooling or aforementioned phase-change cooling.
  2. Mr Kagouris said:
    1) Because it doesn't magically know what CPU cooling you have. For all it knows you could be running phase-change cooling.

    2) 4.4GHz on a 6700k is waaay too conservative and 1.32V way too high for that clockspeed. Lower the voltage more or increase clockspeed, you should be stable at 4.6-4.8GHz with 1.3-1.35V. You won't get better results from reinstalling the cooler. 1.4V on any modern CPU is only sustainable with custom watercooling or aforementioned phase-change cooling.

    Thanks a lot for this helpful and very useful info! What a huge relieve that the problem is not the fan installation! :wahoo:

    Under these circumstances I still find it weird that AI Suite sets the voltage so high. Since the program can't even guess the cooling, you'd think it'd play it safer, not to risk frying the CPU.

    If I decide to be on the conservative side and run the CPU at 4500 MHz, what voltage would you say (ballpark) I should aim for? Around 1.28V? Less?
  3. With your cooling, keep it at 1.3V and see how high it goes. After you've reached the max stable clockspeed, fine tune the voltage to see how low it can go and stay stable.
  4. Excellent! Huge thanks!
Ask a new question

Read More

Asus Overclocking Intel i7