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Chipset HeatSink getting really hot when overclocking?

I have an i5-6400 overclocked to 4.3 at 1.35V which is 100% stable but i have found that the chipset heatsink is getting really hot. Before someone says that it is a heatsink and it is designed to remove heat, i am only asking because it is getting so hot that it is very uncomfortable to touch let alone hold your finger on the heatsink for more than a few seconds. Is this normal, if so why? If not are there anythings that i should try to do to alleviate the problem?

My build is as follows...

Intel i5-6400
16GB Gskill Ripjaws
GTX 970 SC
EVGA 750W Supernova 80+Bronze
Gigabyte GA-Z170 HD3P revision 1
2 Seagate Barracuda 2TB HDD
ADATA Premier 240GB SP550
4 Deepcool TF120
CoolerMaster Hyper H110I GTX
Corsair 780T Case
Optical Drive
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  1. Best answer
    So...
    You aren't crashing or having issues, but you're concerned because the chip gets hot to the touch?

    It sounds normal, so without any evidence of overheating I'm not sure how to help.
  2. well i thinks its obvious, the chipset is designed for an specific amount of voltage, if you overclock.. + voltage = + heat :o. If its too much, u want to continue overclocking and money isnt a problem, you could try overclocking your chipset too.. If you had a customizable wc loop u could do this.


    BTW whats your motherboard? that could help, some models have design defects or factory problems.
  3. da said:
    well i thinks its obvious, the chipset is designed for an specific amount of voltage, if you overclock.. + voltage = + heat :o. If its too much, u want to continue overclocking and money isnt a problem, you could try overclocking your chipset too.. If you had a customizable wc loop u could do this.


    BTW whats your motherboard? that could help, some models have design defects or factory problems.


    I wouldnt even know where to start when it comes to overclocking the chipset and not only that i dont really see the benefit, or the risk to reward ratio, being that high when it comes to overclocking the chipset. (Please do correct me if i am wrong though). As for the motherboard it is a gigabyte ga-z170-hd3p revision 1 motherboard which i am considering upgrading soon.

    Thanks for the reply!

    Jason H
  4. There's no good reason to overclock a chipset.
    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/skylake-intel-core-i7-6700k-core-i5-6600k,4252-2.html

    It in no way would affect processing power. Even something like a graphics card isn't limited by the chipset speed (and the main one is talking to the CPU directly; that's the x16 PCIe v3 on the top left).

    The chipset is basically for storage devices, network, audio.

    (And the motherboard is fine. I don't know why you'd replace it.)
  5. photonboy said:
    There's no good reason to overclock a chipset.
    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/skylake-intel-core-i7-6700k-core-i5-6600k,4252-2.html

    It in no way would affect processing power. Even something like a graphics card isn't limited by the chipset speed (and the main one is talking to the CPU directly).

    I suppose if you were some extreme overclocker it would be a thing, but not for the average person.

    (And the motherboard is fine. I don't know why you'd replace it.)



    I was considering upgrading it for better overlocking of the CPU and support of SLI for Nvidia but i am not so sure now because by the time that i can afford sli i could have also just purchased the new 1070, or considering the possible recoup of my old 970 i may even be able to get the 1080 that is going to be coming out soon which is said to be the same performance as a titan x so i see no need for it now (the 1070 is said to equal the titan x and the 1080 is said to way outperform it or at least that is what i gathered from the release information)

    Thanks for your input on my problem!

    Jason H
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