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Don't know where to start for PC Upgrade.

Hello. I wanted to ask the community on help on how I should upgrade my PC.

Here is my build:My Current Build

Looking to upgrade to play the latest games, and future games maxed out settings.
I've asked others and they said I would have to upgrade both my CPU for a beefier graphics card. I saw this build on PCPartPicker: New PC and was thinking it may be a good place to start. Without the harddrives and possibly not the case it comes to $650. Any other options? Thanks :D
3 answers Last reply Best Answer
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  1. Best answer
    Depends how long you want to be able to max out new games.

    Max out new today, you can pair an i5 with an R9 390 (or 390x). Long term it's impossible to know, but chances are good you'd need something better (like an i7, either Haswell or Skylake) to last a few generations pushing out max or near max.

    A $650 probably isn't going to cut it, so if that's your budget (it's not particularly clear) you could aim for max today and scale back your settings over time.

    The "New" build you linked has a few issues. The PSU is not particularly great quality, older generation CPU, not utilizing dual channel RAM (and only 8GB....that's fine today, but may be left lacking in future).

    Your options:

    1. The "max settings now" build.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i5-6600K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($233.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($34.50 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z170A-X1 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($92.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: GeIL EVO POTENZA 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($67.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon R9 390 8GB Video Card ($299.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: NZXT S340 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: EVGA 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($48.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $838.43
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-04-20 23:11 EDT-0400

    It's an $800 build, without drives, an OS etc. But gives you a board you can OC on, a CPU you can OC (and can replace with an i7 in future if you wanted to go that route). The PSU is overkill, but great quality & the best price you'll find (after rebates). The PSU, unfortunately, stops short of allowing CrossFire in future, reliably at least. It's just a little on the low side for ideal operation.

    2. The "longevity" build.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i7-5820K 3.3GHz 6-Core Processor ($369.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i GTX 70.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($107.88 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: ASRock X99 Extreme3 ATX LGA2011-3 Motherboard ($169.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($69.88 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 980 Ti 6GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($589.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 980 Ti 6GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($589.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: NZXT S340 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: EVGA 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($48.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $2006.70
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-04-20 23:16 EDT-0400

    It's overkill initially, but over time the additional cores, OC ability, SLI GPUs etc would help stretch it out to last for years at max.


    You'll see the dramatic price difference. The second build should be able to max out games for longer but, of course, there's no way of knowing future requirements - the best bet is to build what you need (or want) today and upgrade as you go.


    Consider a $2,000 build today vs an $800 with maybe a $500 investment in a new GPU in a couple of years (there's new generations of GPUs coming out shortly). A single, more powerful card is always preferred over SLI/CrossFire.

    Even if you had to replace the i5 with an i7(6700) in future, you'd be talking a couple of hundred dollars on the CPU, with ~$500 on the GPU.

    So that's comparing a $2k build today, that will last.....but at the same time, an $800 build + ~$500 card in a couple of years......maybe $200 on the CPU if totally necessary (chances are it wouldn't be in the next couple of years). Worst case scenario, you still end up $500 cheaper, getting newer tech down the line.
  2. Barty1884 said:
    Depends how long you want to be able to max out new games.

    Max out new today, you can pair an i5 with an R9 390 (or 390x). Long term it's impossible to know, but chances are good you'd need something better (like an i7, either Haswell or Skylake) to last a few generations pushing out max or near max.

    A $650 probably isn't going to cut it, so if that's your budget (it's not particularly clear) you could aim for max today and scale back your settings over time.

    The "New" build you linked has a few issues. The PSU is not particularly great quality, older generation CPU, not utilizing dual channel RAM (and only 8GB....that's fine today, but may be left lacking in future).

    Your options:

    1. The "max settings now" build.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i5-6600K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($233.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($34.50 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z170A-X1 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($92.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: GeIL EVO POTENZA 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($67.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon R9 390 8GB Video Card ($299.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: NZXT S340 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: EVGA 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($48.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $838.43
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-04-20 23:11 EDT-0400

    It's an $800 build, without drives, an OS etc. But gives you a board you can OC on, a CPU you can OC (and can replace with an i7 in future if you wanted to go that route). The PSU is overkill, but great quality & the best price you'll find (after rebates). The PSU, unfortunately, stops short of allowing CrossFire in future, reliably at least. It's just a little on the low side for ideal operation.

    2. The "longevity" build.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i7-5820K 3.3GHz 6-Core Processor ($369.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i GTX 70.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($107.88 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: ASRock X99 Extreme3 ATX LGA2011-3 Motherboard ($169.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($69.88 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 980 Ti 6GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($589.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 980 Ti 6GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($589.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: NZXT S340 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: EVGA 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($48.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $2006.70
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-04-20 23:16 EDT-0400

    It's overkill initially, but over time the additional cores, OC ability, SLI GPUs etc would help stretch it out to last for years at max.


    You'll see the dramatic price difference. The second build should be able to max out games for longer but, of course, there's no way of knowing future requirements - the best bet is to build what you need (or want) today and upgrade as you go.


    Consider a $2,000 build today vs an $800 with maybe a $500 investment in a new GPU in a couple of years (there's new generations of GPUs coming out shortly). A single, more powerful card is always preferred over SLI/CrossFire.

    Even if you had to replace the i5 with an i7(6700) in future, you'd be talking a couple of hundred dollars on the CPU, with ~$500 on the GPU.

    So that's comparing a $2k build today, that will last.....but at the same time, an $800 build + ~$500 card in a couple of years......maybe $200 on the CPU if totally necessary (chances are it wouldn't be in the next couple of years). Worst case scenario, you still end up $500 cheaper, getting newer tech down the line.


    Thank you for your reply. I think I may go with the $800 build. ATM I could not afford a $2000 build, unless I saved up for awhile. Possibly sell my old build on craigslist.
  3. As I mentioned though, even if you could afford a $2k build, I wouldn't recommend it.

    You end up cheaper in the long run, with newer components to upgrade as you go.

    You could shave a couple of bucks off the build:
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i5-6600K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($233.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($34.50 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z170-HD3 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($87.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws 4 series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory ($54.90 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon R9 390 8GB Video Card ($299.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.99 @ Micro Center)
    Power Supply: EVGA 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($48.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $805.34
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-04-21 10:29 EDT-0400
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