Solved

Buying cooler and case for overclocking

Hi,

I'm thinking about overclocking but I know I need to buy a new cooler and case if I want a stable build.
I was hoping not to spend more than 100€, what do you advice?

My rig:

OS: Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
CPU: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7 CPU 870 @ 2.93GHZ
GPU: AMD Radeon HD 5670
Memory: 2x HyperX Savage 2400MHz 8GB
Disk: SATA 232 GB
PSU: NOX NX 750W
Motherboard: ASUS P7P55 LX
7 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about buying cooler case overclocking
  1. Best answer
    If you want to overclock your PC to the maxx, you need a new cooler and a new case.
    However, it might not be worth spending the money, especially on an old PC.
    I suggest you try overclocking your PC as it is.
    Just keep the processor on stock voltage (don't leave it on Auto in the BIOS, manually fix it in the BIOS to stock voltage, and increase the frequencies step by step)
    You may well get a fair bit of extra performance for free without increasing temperatures very much. Just keep a careful eye on your CPU temperature.
    If you overclock sucessfully, but still need more, then consider spending some money on better cooling.

    As you can see from my signature, I got a decent overclock out of a cheap motherboard and case, and the stock cooler.
  2. lodders said:
    If you want to overclock your PC to the maxx, you need a new cooler and a new case.
    However, it might not be worth spending the money, especially on an old PC.
    I suggest you try overclocking your PC as it is.
    Just keep the processor on stock voltage (don't leave it on Auto in the BIOS, manually fix it in the BIOS to stock voltage, and increase the frequencies step by step)
    You may well get a fair bit of extra performance for free without increasing temperatures very much. Just keep a careful eye on your CPU temperature.
    If you overclock sucessfully, but still need more, then consider spending some money on better cooling.

    As you can see from my signature, I got a decent overclock out of a cheap motherboard and case, and the stock cooler.



    The problem is that I'm getting high idle temp already, maybe because the case sucks or the CPU being old. (Image bellow)
    Do you still advice the oc with the build as is?

    http://
  3. The only thing that really matters is the full load temperature. Idle temp doesn't harm anything......
    however, if your PC is old, and running hot, some new thermal paste will probably cool things down considerably.
    Make sure you clean off the old paste properly and apply new correctly.
  4. About 85ºC at 100% load, that's why I'm worried. I've already applied thermal paste, and the temp went down, before the full load was reaching 95-99 ºC.

    Thanks for the attention btw.
  5. Wow - that is hot.
    Check the CPU core voltage is normal. If so, your cooler must be defective. Get a hyper 212 cooler or better.
  6. I would say that a cooling chassis doesn't make a huge difference but I am one step away from testing that hypothesis, because I'm using a 15 year old ATX Chassis that way back when, was pretty much the most basic chassis you could buy. An e-Star. I built hundreds of pc's the lx/bx platform which granted me quite a bit of experience with the basic hardware and gave me some confidence in the toughness of pc parts.

    Anyway I have overclocked to 4.9ghz and I would have said the thing that makes the most difference is your CPU heatsink. I was considering this one:

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Cooler-Master-RR-V8VC-16PR-R1-performance-heatpipes/dp/B00DI7002K/ref=sr_1_8?s=computers&ie=UTF8&qid=1460777553&sr=1-8&keywords=cpu+cooler

    Because it has 8 heatpipes.

    Or this one:

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Cooler-Master-RR-V8VC-16PR-R1-performance-heatpipes/dp/B00DI7002K/ref=sr_1_8?s=computers&ie=UTF8&qid=1460777553&sr=1-8&keywords=cpu+cooler

    Same but different somehow. 3 towers 8 pipes 2 fans. Woohoo! Don't be tempted to skimp and buy a cheaper arctic freezer
    because it won't work. You need to deal with at least 200watts of heat. The evo 212 won't be good enough for an extreme overclock. Maybe even 300-400watts on intel cpu's. To way over-spec your heatsink anyways.

    I've got 4 non direct touch heatpipes on my CPU and at a high overlock heat becomes a major major issue plus and I tried sticking 2 more heatpipes on the backplate with some thermal epoxy because I have an old thermalright itx-10 but while the backplate according to the thermal probe I have placed upon the top of the itx-10 back actually, it reads -1.9c but the top heatsink is clearly warmer than that. For every degree C that the cpu package rises the backplate rises ~0.1c.

    I am also considering moving my exhaust from the rear to the side panel to vigorously blow into the chassis directly over the heatsink (in addition to 2 12 inch fans) which might help push warm air out of the case (rather than trying to exhaust it out).

    The case that is drawing my eye is just a cheap bog standard CiT because now I have the reconditioned itx-10 poking out from under the motherboard I need a space by the 5.25 bays & the more expensive ones don't have that (ironically) plus one of the CiT cases on amazon has got just what I wanted, a hole in the motherboard tray under the cpu backplate (so I can stick more things to it.. got some ideas.

    Maybe if I run a heatpipe from the top heatsink where it's warm & bend it round to the backplate & itx 10 where is is purportedly sub-zero.. get my drift? I might save £60 on that monster heatsink and spend only £20 on that cheap chassis. Obviously it's not so easy building your own custom heatpipe array but I might only have to spend £12 on a couple of heatpipes and a couple of easy-fit non-solder screw type heatpads for securing heatpipes and I could do some interesting things like attach a heatpipe (via a heatpad resting on it) to the side panel and use that entire surface area of the chassis for cooling.

    but off the shelfs neglect too many details and you can't buy anything if you don't know exactly what you're getting. You need measurements details and to know where all the holes gaps spaces nooks, crevices are etc. in your chassis and what kind of obstructions or gaps your heatsink will have and if you can attach any additional bits and pieces here and there etc. or what will fit or lend itself to customization.

    I went into maplin and had a look at one of the expensive chassis I saw on amazon.. couldn't take the covers off because the thumbscrews were too tight... ( I didn't even bother asking the dipsticks in maplin for help they buzz around like mosquitos but only to pressure you into buying stuff) but I could peer through the grille on top and the expensive chassis does not have the crevice where I have installed my backplate itx-10 which extends to a recess on the far side panel next to the 5.25 bays but it appears that one of the cheaper CiT cases does.

    Anyway if you're going to spend £20 on more cooling fans just buy a 'cooling chassis' that has 2-3 or 4 12 inch fans already instead.

    Put it like this: if I only spend £12 on the raw heatpipe & heatpads and bend them to fit (plus I scored a couple ripping apart an arctic a11-way too inadequate) and it still doesn't cool me to under 60c then I would buy the 'cooling chassis' with the drive bays in the different orientation facing the side panels instead of the front panel (this is a better reason to buy a new chassis; it will help cable management plus they tend to now have bays for ssd's) and if the cooling chassis didn't get me there then I would then take out the arctic freezer extreme that I own (scored it in bargain bin for £15) and rip it apart for the heatpipes and find some way to attach those and then get the coolermaster v8 for ~£60 and if that don't get me nowhere then well \o/ mama mia.
  7. I have just installed my cooling chassis which is a thermaltake v3 with lots of meshes and huge ventilation with the psu at the floor of the chassis.

    What I'd say is that the cable management is slightly better as are the drive bays (I get one more 3.5bay over my old chassis) and the system speaker no longer takes up space on the floor of the chassis 'cos you get a nice tidy doodad stuck on the end of a couple of wires to connect to the speaker pins.

    It also has vents in the floor, a dust filter at the PSU and space for 4-5 12 inch fans.


    However in and of itself it did not produce any extra cooling. The fan that was doing the most work in my system in bringing the cpu package to measure 0c while I browse the web here and type is the i-series fan.

    What makes the hugest difference is the direct contact heatsink on your cpu.

    The next thing that makes the difference is the CF.M of your fans. This i-series fan that I'm so fond of shifts ten times it's weight in air. It is the ant of the fan world.

    however the other fans are now ventilating the top of the chassis through another mesh as well as a 12inch at the rear. And air is being drawn in through the floor of the chassis and the front. It should be delivering some additional performance but it doesn't seem to be all that great a difference; maybe I will have to test it longer at a load to see if the thermals are more even. It is not doing enough however, to get me to 5ghz & overclock my cpu memory controller to ddr3 2400. I don't know if water cooling or a coolermaster v8 will do the job or if I want is practically impossible for cheap stuff out of the bargain bin. I really do not want to spend £100 on watercooling. I want to go down the cheapskate route and get optimal cooling for minimum price.

    I would connect my waterblock to the central heating if it didn't have a gas boiler on it. After all your rads. are just a giant heatsink for your gas burner - it's more central cooling than heating. If you could get a cheap radiator from a junkyard or a skip is there some sort of law of physics that says you couldn't use it to cool your cpu? Exactly! Then you just need a pump, a cpu/gpu block, reservoir and an idea to bleed air from the system. The technology of small differences in branded products is just where they have been able to come up with ideas in a machine shop. Since you don't have one you just have to jury rig.

    Who says your pump has to fit over your cpu block or in a 5.25 bay with a reservoir? Only the dictatorial developers with a key to the tool shed.

    The chassis in and of itself doesn't do the job although it's nice to have some of the features that are on this chassis, the business part of it, the actual cooling performance will vary with your ambient temperature and the performance of your fans and how well you can vent the heat from your environment as well.

    An old tired psu can put out too much heat as well so you have to consider all sorts of things.

    But if you have a serviceable chassis there is no particular need to get a cooling chassis it won't cool any more than yout existing one likely but if you stick all sorts of additional fans with high air flow then you could create quite the tornado to move the air out of the case and to disperse into the environment, without too much noise if you get decent-ish ones.

    As many cooling cases offer several fans pre-installed, the 'cooling' you are getting is delivered by the fans and not the case. So if you intended to spend £20 on more fans it doesn't take much logic to spend £25 on a new case if it has got plenty of fans pre-installed and a few other nik naks to pretty it up a bit.

    Some also have holes for water cooling tubes mine has got a couple by the gpu.
Ask a new question

Read More

Overclocking Cooling Cases