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Long term storage of an SSD based system

Hey, guys and girls.

I am currently in training, studying and living in the UAE (bloody hot weather for those who don't know!). Now, my academy are predicting about a 4/5 month delay from ground school to continuing the training in Portugal, which would take another 3 months or so. I am curious as to your guys' opinion on what to do with my PC (6600k/H90/970SSC/256gb M.2 Samsung SSD/120GB Sandisk SSD/4tb Mech) in the meantime.

Whilst i am out of the country i am debating on whether to leave my pc with a friend who can turn it on every now and again to get the fluids mixing and windows updated, or leave it in my flat with a dust cover over top, all power cut off and sunlight blocked out to keep heat down, usually it gets to around 28 C if the AC is off for a long time with windows closed.

Having read this thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/290795-32-permanence-data-powered

It seems that i might be able to get away with leaving it but it's a lot of money to fix if it doesn't turn out as i'm hoping!

Your thoughts? Anyone with experience in this area?
6 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about long term storage ssd based system
  1. Best answer
    If it didnt have a water rig, I'd say just mothball it. But since it does, my vote would be to have your buddy foster it for you and kick it on once in a while. Also you could just have him keep it on full time and turn it in to a video server so you can watch videos on your phone. Providing your in a part of Portugal with access to Wifi.
  2. Article about SSD data retention

    When powered off and stored in a 30°C environment, client SSDs (non-enterprise class) that are used in a 40º working environment are required to retain data for 1 year, to meet JEDEC standards. This is after you've filled the drive to capacity. Drives that have significantly less wear will retain the data for a longer period of time.

    If the SSD sits long enough to lose data, the SSD itself is still fully functional, but you will want to clean it off and start with it as though it were a new drive.

    If there is anything of significant value on your SSD, my recommendation is to simply make an image of the entire SSD to a standard hard disk before you last power it down, from which you could completely restore the SSD in the event it did happen to lose data.

    A great program to image your drive with is SelfImage as it's free and you can image an SSD you are currently running Windows from without any complicated procedures. Just direct it to save the image to a file on a normal hard disk, and you will have a complete snapshot of your system from that point.

    The downside of leaving a computer with a friend is that you may come home to find the computer is not in the same condition you left it in. Personally, I would make a hard disk backup of any SSDs and just leave the machine unplugged while away. The dust cover is a nice touch. :)

    Edit: I wouldn't worry about the water cooler sitting around. They sit around for countless months on store or warehouse shelves before you purchase them. Albeit probably remote, moving the system now that the cooler has been run for a while could actually end up helping air bubbles to migrate into the pump and cause issues.
  3. bigpinkdragon286 said:
    Article about SSD data retention

    When powered off and stored in a 30°C environment, client SSDs (non-enterprise class) that are used in a 40º working environment are required to retain data for 1 year, to meet JEDEC standards. This is after you've filled the drive to capacity. Drives that have significantly less wear will retain the data for a longer period of time.

    If the SSD sits long enough to lose data, the SSD itself is still fully functional, but you will want to clean it off and start with it as though it were a new drive.

    If there is anything of significant value on your SSD, my recommendation is to simply make an image of the entire SSD to a standard hard disk before you last power it down, from which you could completely restore the SSD in the event it did happen to lose data.

    A great program to image your drive with is SelfImage as it's free and you can image an SSD you are currently running Windows from without any complicated procedures. Just direct it to save the image to a file on a normal hard disk, and you will have a complete snapshot of your system from that point.

    The downside of leaving a computer with a friend is that you may come home to find the computer is not in the same condition you left it in. Personally, I would make a hard disk backup of any SSDs and just leave the machine unplugged while away. The dust cover is a nice touch. :)

    Edit: I wouldn't worry about the water cooler sitting around. They sit around for countless months on store or warehouse shelves before you purchase them. Albeit probably remote, moving the system now that the cooler has been run for a while could actually end up helping air bubbles to migrate into the pump and cause issues.


    My concern would be for any seals in the pump. Just know with anything with a seal if its left stagnate for too long after regular use, it runs the risk of drying up. Not knowing enough about AIO's I don't know if this is a factor he'd have to worry about.
  4. The seal is exposed to liquid %100 of the time from manufacture. After using an AIO cooler, any air in the system should be at the top of the radiator. Moving it is the most likely way for that air to get where you don't want it, which happens to be back in the pump. I would personally opt not to move such a system and risk air in the pump. If you're going to leak, it's not going to be because the unit was off.
  5. bigpinkdragon286 said:
    The seal is exposed to liquid %100 of the time from manufacture. After using an AIO cooler, any air in the system should be at the top of the radiator. Moving it is the most likely way for that air to get where you don't want it, which happens to be back in the pump. I would personally opt not to move such a system and risk air in the pump. If you're going to leak, it's not going to be because the unit was off.


    Good to know
  6. Thanks for your replies guys, i think i'll take option A and leave it with my buddy.... At least i know it'll be in safe hands! We recently had a major fire which took out 3 buildings in my apartment complex!
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