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Does Maximus VIII Formula have enough slots for 2 GTX 980 TI and one PCI SSD Samsung 950 Pro PCIe NVMe M2 SSD ?

Does Maximus VIII Formula have enough slots for 2 GTX 980 TI and one Samsung 950 Pro PCIe NVMe M2 SSD ?

or should i get another Mainboard for this combo ? maybe VIII Extreme ?


also which slots should i place the VGA's and the PCI SSD ? can you tell me from the pictures of M.B in this site ? : https://www.asus.com/Motherboards/ROG-MAXIMUS-VIII-FORMULA/
4 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about maximus viii formula slots gtx 980 pci ssd samsung 950 pro pcie nvme ssd
  1. Best answer
    All of the asus high end atx motherboards will have two pcie x16 slots suitable for sli.
    One puts the first card in the slot closest to the cpu, and the other will be the next one away which will be separated to allow for better cooling.
    Each will operate as X8.
    That leaves enough capacity for X4 m.2 Samsung 950 PRO as well as a couple of sata ports.

    The very high end is probably not necessary unless you are a professional overclocker.

    Looks to me like the more modest Maximus VIII ranger would do the job just as well:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813132586
  2. geofelt said:
    All of the asus high end atx motherboards will have two pcie x16 slots suitable for sli.
    One puts the first card in the slot closest to the cpu, and the other will be the next one away which will be separated to allow for better cooling.
    Each will operate as X8.
    That leaves enough capacity for X4 m.2 Samsung 950 PRO as well as a couple of sata ports.

    The very high end is probably not necessary unless you are a professional overclocker.

    Looks to me like the more modest Maximus VIII ranger would do the job just as well:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813132586


    I know this is an old thread, but had a quick question. I will be having the same setup. Dual gtx 980 ti, asus maximus Viii formula. Will I be able to make the M.2 drive, my main windows boot drive? And will it still be faster then most Sata drives?
  3. Yes, it can be a boot drive.
    M.2 comes in sata like the Samsung evo and NVMe which comes in the 950 PRO.
    Both will work fine for boot even in a sli environment.
    You will win some synthetic ssd benchmarks with a X4 MVme 950 pro, but in normal operations you will not notice the difference.
    I noticed nothing different changing from a 850 pro to a 950 pro.

    Do not be much swayed by vendor synthetic SSD benchmarks.
    They are done with apps that push the SSD to it's maximum using queue lengths of 30 or so.
    Most desktop users will do one or two things at a time, so they will see queue lengths of one or two.
    What really counts is the response times, particularly for small random I/O. That is what the os does mostly.
    For that, the response times of current SSD's are remarkably similar. And quick. They will be 50X faster than a hard drive.
    In sequential operations, they will be 2x faster than a hard drive, perhaps 3x if you have a sata3 interface.
    Larger SSD's are preferable. They have more nand chips that can be accessed in parallel. Sort of an internal raid-0 if you will.
    Also, a SSD will slow down as it approaches full. That is because it will have a harder time finding free nand blocks to do an update without a read/write operation.
  4. geofelt said:
    Yes, it can be a boot drive.
    M.2 comes in sata like the Samsung evo and NVMe which comes in the 950 PRO.
    Both will work fine for boot even in a sli environment.
    You will win some synthetic ssd benchmarks with a X4 MVme 950 pro, but in normal operations you will not notice the difference.
    I noticed nothing different changing from a 850 pro to a 950 pro.

    Do not be much swayed by vendor synthetic SSD benchmarks.
    They are done with apps that push the SSD to it's maximum using queue lengths of 30 or so.
    Most desktop users will do one or two things at a time, so they will see queue lengths of one or two.
    What really counts is the response times, particularly for small random I/O. That is what the os does mostly.
    For that, the response times of current SSD's are remarkably similar. And quick. They will be 50X faster than a hard drive.
    In sequential operations, they will be 2x faster than a hard drive, perhaps 3x if you have a sata3 interface.
    Larger SSD's are preferable. They have more nand chips that can be accessed in parallel. Sort of an internal raid-0 if you will.
    Also, a SSD will slow down as it approaches full. That is because it will have a harder time finding free nand blocks to do an update without a read/write operation.


    Thank you for the detailed response. I think I even learned something new today as well!! Really appreciate you taking the time to answer my questions!! Thank you!!!
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