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My PSU capacitors keep blowing

Hey guys, so I was on my PC playing CS:GO, while I played, I heard a pop and saw a flash from my psu, naturally it turned off the system.
I have since replaced the psu, and upon switching the psu on, about 2 seconds after I moved away from the psu switch the same thing happened (I didn't press the power button)
What could be the issue?
Parts: gigabyte 970a-ds3p
Gigabyte gtx 750 ti
AMD fx-8350
2 corsair ram sticks (not 100% on the series, both 4 gb 1600mhz)
NZXT h440
12 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about psu capacitors blowing
  1. What power supply is it?
  2. Both unbranded
  3. Benbeal123 said:
    Both unbranded


    So basically garbage. That explains a lot now. :heink: Where did you buy it? It has to have a name.
  4. The point is, both had blown capacitors, upon rechecking one of them is an evo labs psu, both are 500w
  5. Well that happens when you buy garbage, they also tend to fry other components. You should never skimp on the psu. Possible the when the first failed it overvolted and fused a short somewhere and thats what fried the 2nd one.
  6. Never heard of EVO Labs. If anything I would not touch their power supplies with a 10 foot pole made of rubber. There are no professional reviews done on these units online (not even unprofessional reviews), they are highly unknown, and obviously you first-hand have experienced that the units they make are absolute dangerous fire hazards. Stay away from it and buy a proper PSU, you'll be much happier and safer. :)
  7. You need to purchase a branded reliable PSU to protect your components.
  8. Best answer
    Benbeal123 said:
    Hey guys, so I was on my PC playing CS:GO, while I played, I heard a pop and saw a flash from my psu, naturally it turned off the system.
    I have since replaced the psu, and upon switching the psu on, about 2 seconds after I moved away from the psu switch the same thing happened (I didn't press the power button)
    What could be the issue?
    Parts: gigabyte 970a-ds3p
    Gigabyte gtx 750 ti
    AMD fx-8350
    2 corsair ram sticks (not 100% on the series, both 4 gb 1600mhz)
    NZXT h440


    Everyone is quick to blame your PSU... but I think you should take a long look at everything. A PSU that's inexpensive does not automatically fail. I've seen the popular name-brands fail all the time.

    First, you need to have some kind of protection from the outlet. Do you use a surge suppressor at all or do you just plug it into the wall?

    Is this a custom build? Did you do it yourself? One problem people have is improperly mounting the motherboard into the case.

    I have also read about bad case fans causing PSU's to fail.. as well as bad motherboards. Basically, anything that draws power could have a short in it or a TOUCHING WIRE. I would also look around carefully at everything to make sure you don't have any broken or stripped wires... just to be sure.
  9. Do the 2 PSUs look the identical to you? Those generic stuff may come with different labels but may had come from the same plant and manufacturing line. If so, could be a factory defect. Used to work in such an outfit and all of a sudden getting all these returns and upon detail inspection they had used the wrong value cap.
  10. SBMfromLA said:
    Benbeal123 said:
    Hey guys, so I was on my PC playing CS:GO, while I played, I heard a pop and saw a flash from my psu, naturally it turned off the system.
    I have since replaced the psu, and upon switching the psu on, about 2 seconds after I moved away from the psu switch the same thing happened (I didn't press the power button)
    What could be the issue?
    Parts: gigabyte 970a-ds3p
    Gigabyte gtx 750 ti
    AMD fx-8350
    2 corsair ram sticks (not 100% on the series, both 4 gb 1600mhz)
    NZXT h440


    Everyone is quick to blame your PSU... but I think you should take a long look at everything. A PSU that's inexpensive does not automatically fail. I've seen the popular name-brands fail all the time.

    First, you need to have some kind of protection from the outlet. Do you use a surge suppressor at all or do you just plug it into the wall?

    Is this a custom build? Did you do it yourself? One problem people have is improperly mounting the motherboard into the case.

    I have also read about bad case fans causing PSU's to fail.. as well as bad motherboards. Basically, anything that draws power could have a short in it or a TOUCHING WIRE. I would also look around carefully at everything to make sure you don't have any broken or stripped wires... just to be sure.



    It's not like a power surge is constantly hitting his house, he would know if it was, and most non-junk power supplies have metal oxide varistors in the transient filter stage which are surge suppressors built into the PSU.
  11. turkey3_scratch said:
    SBMfromLA said:
    Benbeal123 said:
    Hey guys, so I was on my PC playing CS:GO, while I played, I heard a pop and saw a flash from my psu, naturally it turned off the system.
    I have since replaced the psu, and upon switching the psu on, about 2 seconds after I moved away from the psu switch the same thing happened (I didn't press the power button)
    What could be the issue?
    Parts: gigabyte 970a-ds3p
    Gigabyte gtx 750 ti
    AMD fx-8350
    2 corsair ram sticks (not 100% on the series, both 4 gb 1600mhz)
    NZXT h440


    Everyone is quick to blame your PSU... but I think you should take a long look at everything. A PSU that's inexpensive does not automatically fail. I've seen the popular name-brands fail all the time.

    First, you need to have some kind of protection from the outlet. Do you use a surge suppressor at all or do you just plug it into the wall?

    Is this a custom build? Did you do it yourself? One problem people have is improperly mounting the motherboard into the case.

    I have also read about bad case fans causing PSU's to fail.. as well as bad motherboards. Basically, anything that draws power could have a short in it or a TOUCHING WIRE. I would also look around carefully at everything to make sure you don't have any broken or stripped wires... just to be sure.



    It's not like a power surge is constantly hitting his house, he would know if it was, and most non-junk power supplies have metal oxide varistors in the transient filter stage which are surge suppressors built into the PSU.



    Perhaps... but it's highly possible spikes could put extra strain on his components... thus causing a shortening of it's lifespan. A power strip is still the best defense against that.
  12. It's clear that the PSU is being run beyond what it can safely output.

    If you knew anything about EVO LABS PSUs you would know that they are labeled with a wattage that is clearly beyond what they are really able to supply. You're lucky if it can really output 250 Watts.
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