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SSD health Reading confusion

I have just got my New Adata SP550 240GB SSD. Before data migration I checked my SSD health via a couple of software surprisingly, there are different reading for different tool. I am so confused which one should I rely on. Only HD Tune pro is giving relocated event count flag.

1. HD Tune pro.




2. ADATA SSD tool



3. SSD Life PRO



4. Crystal Disk Life

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  1. Hey there, nirjhar mistry.

    It seems like your SSD has one retired memory block which is odd if this is a new drive. The reallocation event count shows the number of tries to move the data from this block.
    From what I see only the first program you've used shows data for retired memory blocks and the others seem not to have that attribute available for test. I don't know if this is going to affect the life of the SSD in the long run, or if you'd be able to use it without a hitch for years to come, but I'd suggest that you contact the drive manufacturer's customer support (or the reseller you bought it from) and ask if you can RMA it, just to be on the safe side.

    Hope that helps. Please let me know how everything goes.
    Boogieman_WD
  2. Boogieman_WD said:
    Hey there, nirjhar mistry.

    It seems like your SSD has one retired memory block which is odd if this is a new drive. The reallocation event count shows the number of tries to move the data from this block.
    From what I see only the first program you've used shows data for retired memory blocks and the others seem not to have that attribute available for test. I don't know if this is going to affect the life of the SSD in the long run, or if you'd be able to use it without a hitch for years to come, but I'd suggest that you contact the drive manufacturer's customer support (or the reseller you bought it from) and ask if you can RMA it, just to be on the safe side.

    Hope that helps. Please let me know how everything goes.
    Boogieman_WD


    I had received the product from an ONLINE retailer in INDIA, and they have 15days return policy. So it's fine. Although it's odd for a new drive, right?
  3. Best answer
    Well, if there's really a retired memory block on a brand new drive, I wouldn't take any chances with it. If I were you (having in mind you can still return it, or ask for a replacement), I'd take advantage of that option and ask for a replacement. It's better to be safe than sorry. :)
  4. With the drive empty, try to shrink the volume of the disk in question (google) and see if it reports an unmovable file that prevents you from shrinking the max amount. If it does (which it should not since there should not be anything on it) check and filter the event viewer (google) for a "259" code and check the most current one and see what it says.

    If that checks out, transfer a bunch of crap to it (like fill it up) then delete it once or twice and see if you get more relocated event warnings.


    Probably not going to tell you anything. If windows based tools like CHKDSK says it's good then I would not have a reason to think it's bad right off. Could just be a bad sector during manufacturing.
  5. I have decided to stick with @Boogieman_WD suggestion and asked for a replacement from the vendor. Everything is now fine.
  6. Well, @The_Tester had some good points there, but in my opinion (as I've already mentioned) it's better not to take any chances. Bad sector/block created due to a manufacturing fault is still a bad sector. Unfortunately these things happen sometimes, but it's normal to expect a new drive to be in perfect condition so in my opinion you made the right call.
    However, that doesn't excuse backing up important data, so one should always have a backup option in mind for the most important and irreplaceable files.
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