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System wont boot on new drive after cloning w/o old drive being connected

Problem:
Today I performed my first disk cloning. I am trying to move from my WAY to small 64GB SSD for my OS to a 256GB SSD.
To begin with I was told by someone that you can not clone the hard drive you are actively using so I tried the Gparted method which did not work properly, and was giving me a bootmgr missing error, mainly I think this was due to the recovery partition not being assigned properly (definitely user error). After a couple hours tinkering with that I decided to use EaseUS Todo Backup Free 8.0, after i found out you could clone your active disk.
After performing this twice (I forgot to add the recovery partition the first time) I was finally able to get the new SSD to appear to boot properly. Although once i removed the old 64GB SSD the computer would not load the OS and would take me to recovery options.
Also when my old SSD in connected it still says that it is the boot drive in DiskManagement and it wont allow me to format it or change the drive letter.

I had used EasyBCD to make the A drive (the new SSD) the boot drive but I'm not sure that it actually did, based on Disk Management.
Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
5 answers Last reply Best Answer
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  1. Best answer
    Welcome to the TH community, roguecrewdog!

    I'd advise you to repeat the cloning procedure again using a different cloning software. Here's a thread that you can refer to for some third-party suggestions: http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/answers/id-1848564/hdd-cloning-software.html
    I'd also strongly recommend you to consider performing a clean install of Windows onto your new SSD. However, make sure you disconnect all other storage devices from the SATA ports on the motherboard. Having more than one storage drive will cause an OS confusion which, again, will require you to repeat the clean install. You should be able to do it without any issues once you create a bootable USB/CD with the OS version: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-8/clean-install
    Cloning is not really a good idea as it will transfer your redundant files as well. With or without it, you should most definitely re-install all your other software programs in order for them to work properly and at their best performance.

    Hope I was helpful. Keep me posted if you have more questions! :)
    SuperSoph_WD
  2. SuperSoph_WD said:
    Welcome to the TH community, roguecrewdog!

    I'd advise you to repeat the cloning procedure again using a different cloning software. Here's a thread that you can refer to for some third-party suggestions: http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/answers/id-1848564/hdd-cloning-software.html
    I'd also strongly recommend you to consider performing a clean install of Windows onto your new SSD. However, make sure you disconnect all other storage devices from the SATA ports on the motherboard. Having more than one storage drive will cause an OS confusion which, again, will require you to repeat the clean install. You should be able to do it without any issues once you create a bootable USB/CD with the OS version: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-8/clean-install
    Cloning is not really a good idea as it will transfer your redundant files as well. With or without it, you should most definitely re-install all your other software programs in order for them to work properly and at their best performance.

    Hope I was helpful. Keep me posted if you have more questions! :)
    SuperSoph_WD


    Yeah this is what I was leaning towards as well...I was just waiting I guess for someone else to voice this opinion as well. I think this is what will happen after work today. Thanks :)
  3. Your clone is not the issue, you just need to tell the BIOS to boot from your new drive. You bios will still be looking for your old ssd.
    Go into bios at boot up, change boot drive order to the new one (or basically just put the ssd listed at bottom on top). I suspect it was still booting from the old one all along when both were attached which is why you can't modify it, because its in use. Also, if your planning to use two drives the old one needs to be reformatted first to remove operating system. You'll probly want to repartition it too for max space.
    Let me know if you need more detailed instructions
  4. Cathex said:
    Your clone is not the issue, you just need to tell the BIOS to boot from your new drive. You bios will still be looking for your old ssd.
    Go into bios at boot up, change boot drive order to the new one (or basically just put the ssd listed at bottom on top). I suspect it was still booting from the old one all along when both were attached which is why you can't modify it, because its in use. Also, if your planning to use two drives the old one needs to be reformatted first to remove operating system. You'll probly want to repartition it too for max space.
    Let me know if you need more detailed instructions


    Unfortunately that was not the case, I did go into the BIOS and change the boot order, i even disabled all the other options. I end up just startibg with a fresh install and was able to copy over important files onto the new drive. Thanks for the input though :)
  5. Imaging will also copy the boot partition, where cloning doesn't. With either you may need to increase the partition size, add volume.
    (Better to buy a new windows disk, format and install on ssd and the use a back up to restore your data.)

    For imaging:
    I use Linux which is more specific when installing onto a new hard drive and you can easily set partition size. I would format and partition using something like Mandriva which has a powerful disk utility, or Ubuntu - (Linux CD's's are easy to purchase for small change, usually also postage costs, it is free) which will give you options to resize the drive and set a boot partition, set your op sys drive to be whatever is windows friendly, NTFS, FAT, and FAT32, then after formatting and resizing, take out the disk and do an install using a Windows image that you have previously backed up onto a usb or cloud. Use a Windows restore disk for this. It will then find your boot partition.

    http://www.pagestart.com/win7bckuprstrnhd072610.html has a guide to imaging
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