ISP Router Restarting itself Several times per Day - Help!

Hello.

Currently I have a 100mb ISP plan, which comes with a wireless router (no option to ask for the service without the router). I've connected an Apple Airport to it so that I can use the Airport as the wireless station. The problem is that every few hours, the ISP router automatically resets itself, so everything goes down for 3-4 minutes, then back up again.

What I've tried:
- Using an electricity stabilizer to rule out current changes as the culprit
- Changed the router with my ISP
- Changed the modem with my ISP
- Changed the channels for both my airport and ISP router

I'm really stuck, and the ISP has been to my home 3 or 4 times already, saying that there is no problem with the equipment or internet. Indeed, when the router is up, everything works at high speeds...I have no complaints. What really annoys me is the constant self rebooting.

Any suggestions?
7 answers Last reply
More about isp router restarting times day
  1. What happens if you remove the Apple Airport? Versus just changing channels....

    Leave the Apple Airport off for a day or so. Just to eliminate the possibility.

    What make and model is the ISP router? Can you access any logs?

    What do you mean by "an electricity stablizer"? Surge Protector? Won't protect against a momentary loss of power due to a bad or loose plug, wires intermittently shorting somewhere, maybe a loose screw connection in an electrical outlet or switch in the circuit. Check the router's transformer if it has one.
  2. Thank you for your help.

    Ralston18 said:
    What happens if you remove the Apple Airport? Versus just changing channels....

    Leave the Apple Airport off for a day or so. Just to eliminate the possibility.

    What make and model is the ISP router? Can you access any logs?

    What do you mean by "an electricity stablizer"? Surge Protector? Won't protect against a momentary loss of power due to a bad or loose plug, wires intermittently shorting somewhere, maybe a loose screw connection in an electrical outlet or switch in the circuit. Check the router's transformer if it has one.


    I'll unplug the airport. Problem is, it only started restarting itself recently...the setup was always the same. I'll still check and let you know.

    I'll check the make and model, but it's local (Brazil). Is there any standard way to access the logs, that would pretty much work on any router?

    Yes, a surge protector...the problem is that I connected a modem and the router (ISP provides both...fibre optics) to the Surge Protector, and the modem never restarts. They're both connected. So it most likely is not a momentary loss of power. I acquired it because I though fluctuations were causing the router to restart. I don't believe the router has a transformer.
  3. Generally it is helpful that a problem started without anything changing. However, my sense is that there are more "background/silent" software and firmware updates taking place without the user's neccessarily being aware of that happening. Especially if the manufacturer is quietly fixing some error to avoid any undue attention.

    As for the router logs, two things: 1) the log entries are generally found somewhere in the administrative pages after logging into the router. 2) The actual logging of events may or may not be activated. If you have admin rights to the router it is fairly straightforward to log in and look around.

    The actual information captured and logged can vary in both scope and quality. Sometimes very cryptic with some error coding scheme.

    Could be helpful to look through the user guide/manual beforehand if you have one. Generally you can download a copy from the manufacturer's website using the model and version number. Always try the manufacturer's site first. Failing that, and/or if you have an older discontinued model router, then 3rd party sites may work. Do be careful as there are a number of sites out there "offering" such manuals. Some of those sites are dubious at best.

    If only the router is restarting then try a different socket on the surge protector. While you are at that check the plug carefully for signs of bare metal other than the prongs. Transformer could be built into the router but generally the electrical goes as follows: first a plug, a wire, some plastic "brick" (the transformer), a thinner wire, and then the device (your router). Check all of those wires as well.

    Knowing the router make and model also allows you to go to the manufacturer's website (or other sites as well) and search for problems with that device. FAQ's and forums may provide something useful. Still the manufacturer sites are "controlled" and tend to only address basic generic issues and avoid any appearance of there being some actual problem. Such as defective or low quality transformers....
  4. marcelocn said:
    So it most likely is not a momentary loss of power. I acquired it because I though fluctuations were causing the router to restart. I don't believe the router has a transformer.

    All electronics must have a transformer. What would one check for? That brick is not a transformer.

    Power an incandescent bulb from the same power source. Normal voltage is even when that bulb dims to 50% intensity. Does a bulb dim that much? If not, power is just fine - ideal for any electronics. If bulb dims anywhere near that much, then get fixed what is potentially a major human safety problem with household wiring.

    If a power interruption exists, then all lights on the router extinguish for minutes. If lights only change state (if any one light remains on), that is not a power loss or power problem. What front panel lights do/report is essential to know what is happening. Without such facts, then any recommendation can only be speculation. A perfect example of "your assistance is only as good as facts provided".

    Surge protectors are mostly recommended on urban myth. And by people who ignore numbers. For example, you have suspected a power loss (a near zero voltage). Protector does absolutely nothing until 230 volts well exceeds 500 volts. How often is your voltage spiking that high? Learning numbers means voltage fluctuations are completely ignored by a surge protector. Numbers demonstrate why a protector does absolutely nothing for this anomaly.

    Report useful facts such as what incandescent bulbs are doing and what front panel LEDs are reporting both during normal operation and when the anomaly occurs.
  5. Westom: "That brick is not a transformer."

    Probably meaning we should actually be using "adapter" - correct?

    Just trying to ensure that I keep my terminology straight - thanks.
  6. Ralston18 said:
    Probably meaning we should actually be using "adapter" - correct?
    More specifically, it is a power supply. Supply explains why voltage can drop so low (ie bulb at 50% intensity) and a router works just fine and uninterrupted.
  7. So you have 2 potential WIFI radio in close proximity. Have you at least TURNED OFF the ISP's WIFI radio?
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