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[Update V4]$1000 build, please look over before I buy the parts

V4-Updated on 9:15PM EST 10/24/15
PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/qtW3xr
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/qtW3xr/by_merchant/

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/rt6rkL
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/rt6rkL/by_merchant/

CPU: Intel Core i5-6600 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($215.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-B150M-D3H DDR3 Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($75.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($47.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($84.89 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($44.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: MSI Radeon R9 390 8GB Video Card ($313.98 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Micro Center)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA GS 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ NCIX US)
Monitor: Asus VE247H 23.6" Monitor ($115.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1029.80
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-10-24 21:14 EDT-0400

Gaming,streaming,internet,fapping.
Help a brother out!
19 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about 1000 build buy parts
  1. When you list out a build here, folks will exclude software and periphs from build costs, as it adds an entirely new aspect to it, as such, a build will consist of the case and any hardware inside of it, as well as (in the enthusiast market) any cooling devices that lead out of the case (like radiators). In this case, they'd exclude the monitor. You're looking at an $880 build with this.

    In addition, you should specify what the build is for, I'm going to assume gaming.

    That being said, I normally recommend your build have 45-60% of your budget placed on your performance parts - that is, your CPU and Graphics, with your graphics being 2x the amount of your CPU, making it 15-20% on the CPU, 30-40% on the graphics. The second part to pick is your PSU. Make sure that you're sticking with the current generation of RAM - DDR4 - it helps you future-proof. Once you're past the $500 budget mark, there's no point with downgrading to DDR3. Below it, you might need DDR3 to fit your budget.

    Regarding your build, you should go with a Skylake CPU (6000 series). Your current graphics card is fine. Your current PSU is fine.
  2. Why not go for a new gen skylake build?

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i5-6500 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($197.78 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-B150M-D3H-GSM Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($79.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws 4 series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2400 Memory ($53.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($84.89 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.33 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: MSI Radeon R9 390 8GB Video Card ($313.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Micro Center)
    Power Supply: EVGA 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
    Monitor: Asus VE247H 23.6" Monitor ($115.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1008.93
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-10-24 11:53 EDT-0400
  3. Get a 970 for less $$$ than the 390. And you'll max out all games on that monitor. No need for more. Then get a case with better airflow and a great PSU for less $$$.
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4690 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($212.95 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-H97M-D3H Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($74.98 @ OutletPC)
    Memory: Kingston HyperX Fury Black 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($42.89 @ SuperBiiz)
    Storage: Samsung 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($84.89 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.33 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 970 4GB Superclocked ACX 2.0 Video Card ($309.99 @ Micro Center)
    Case: Cooler Master N200 MicroATX Mid Tower Case ($43.99 @ NCIX US)
    Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA NEX 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($54.99 @ Newegg)
    Monitor: Asus VE247H 23.6" Monitor ($115.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $993.00
  4. envy14tpe said:
    Get a 970 for less $$$ than the 390. And you'll max out all games on that monitor. No need for more. Then get a case with better airflow and a great PSU for less $$$.
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4690 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($212.95 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-H97M-D3H Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($74.98 @ OutletPC)
    Memory: Kingston HyperX Fury Black 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($42.89 @ SuperBiiz)
    Storage: Samsung 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($84.89 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.33 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 970 4GB Superclocked ACX 2.0 Video Card ($309.99 @ Micro Center)
    Case: Cooler Master N200 MicroATX Mid Tower Case ($43.99 @ NCIX US)
    Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA NEX 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($54.99 @ Newegg)
    Monitor: Asus VE247H 23.6" Monitor ($115.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $993.00


    The FSP built G1s are far from great. Its the Superflower G2s that are great PSUs.
  5. MasterMace said:
    When you list out a build here, folks will exclude software and periphs from build costs, as it adds an entirely new aspect to it, as such, a build will consist of the case and any hardware inside of it, as well as (in the enthusiast market) any cooling devices that lead out of the case (like radiators). In this case, they'd exclude the monitor. You're looking at an $880 build with this.

    In addition, you should specify what the build is for, I'm going to assume gaming.

    That being said, I normally recommend your build have 45-60% of your budget placed on your performance parts - that is, your CPU and Graphics, with your graphics being 2x the amount of your CPU, making it 15-20% on the CPU, 30-40% on the graphics. The second part to pick is your PSU. Make sure that you're sticking with the current generation of RAM - DDR4 - it helps you future-proof. Once you're past the $500 budget mark, there's no point with downgrading to DDR3. Below it, you might need DDR3 to fit your budget.

    Regarding your build, you should go with a Skylake CPU (6000 series). Your current graphics card is fine. Your current PSU is fine.



    MasterMace said:
    When you list out a build here, folks will exclude software and periphs from build costs, as it adds an entirely new aspect to it, as such, a build will consist of the case and any hardware inside of it, as well as (in the enthusiast market) any cooling devices that lead out of the case (like radiators). In this case, they'd exclude the monitor. You're looking at an $880 build with this.

    In addition, you should specify what the build is for, I'm going to assume gaming.

    That being said, I normally recommend your build have 45-60% of your budget placed on your performance parts - that is, your CPU and Graphics, with your graphics being 2x the amount of your CPU, making it 15-20% on the CPU, 30-40% on the graphics. The second part to pick is your PSU. Make sure that you're sticking with the current generation of RAM - DDR4 - it helps you future-proof. Once you're past the $500 budget mark, there's no point with downgrading to DDR3. Below it, you might need DDR3 to fit your budget.

    Regarding your build, you should go with a Skylake CPU (6000 series). Your current graphics card is fine. Your current PSU is fine.


    Okay, so then how does this look?
    PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/NPMcXL
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/NPMcXL/by_merchant/

    CPU: Intel Core i5-6600 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($215.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-B150M-D3H DDR3 Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($75.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Memory: Kingston HyperX Fury Black 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($42.89 @ SuperBiiz)
    Storage: Samsung 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($84.89 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($45.89 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: MSI Radeon R9 390 8GB Video Card ($313.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Micro Center)
    Power Supply: Antec EarthWatts Green 650W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($66.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Monitor: Asus VE247H 23.6" Monitor ($115.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1012.60
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-10-24 12:24 EDT-0400
  6. miki77miki said:
    MasterMace said:
    When you list out a build here, folks will exclude software and periphs from build costs, as it adds an entirely new aspect to it, as such, a build will consist of the case and any hardware inside of it, as well as (in the enthusiast market) any cooling devices that lead out of the case (like radiators). In this case, they'd exclude the monitor. You're looking at an $880 build with this.

    In addition, you should specify what the build is for, I'm going to assume gaming.

    That being said, I normally recommend your build have 45-60% of your budget placed on your performance parts - that is, your CPU and Graphics, with your graphics being 2x the amount of your CPU, making it 15-20% on the CPU, 30-40% on the graphics. The second part to pick is your PSU. Make sure that you're sticking with the current generation of RAM - DDR4 - it helps you future-proof. Once you're past the $500 budget mark, there's no point with downgrading to DDR3. Below it, you might need DDR3 to fit your budget.

    Regarding your build, you should go with a Skylake CPU (6000 series). Your current graphics card is fine. Your current PSU is fine.



    MasterMace said:
    When you list out a build here, folks will exclude software and periphs from build costs, as it adds an entirely new aspect to it, as such, a build will consist of the case and any hardware inside of it, as well as (in the enthusiast market) any cooling devices that lead out of the case (like radiators). In this case, they'd exclude the monitor. You're looking at an $880 build with this.

    In addition, you should specify what the build is for, I'm going to assume gaming.

    That being said, I normally recommend your build have 45-60% of your budget placed on your performance parts - that is, your CPU and Graphics, with your graphics being 2x the amount of your CPU, making it 15-20% on the CPU, 30-40% on the graphics. The second part to pick is your PSU. Make sure that you're sticking with the current generation of RAM - DDR4 - it helps you future-proof. Once you're past the $500 budget mark, there's no point with downgrading to DDR3. Below it, you might need DDR3 to fit your budget.

    Regarding your build, you should go with a Skylake CPU (6000 series). Your current graphics card is fine. Your current PSU is fine.


    Okay, so then how does this look?
    PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/NPMcXL
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/NPMcXL/by_merchant/

    CPU: Intel Core i5-6600 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($215.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-B150M-D3H DDR3 Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($75.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Memory: Kingston HyperX Fury Black 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($42.89 @ SuperBiiz)
    Storage: Samsung 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($84.89 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($45.89 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: MSI Radeon R9 390 8GB Video Card ($313.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Micro Center)
    Power Supply: Antec EarthWatts Green 650W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($66.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Monitor: Asus VE247H 23.6" Monitor ($115.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1012.60
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-10-24 12:24 EDT-0400


    Ram is high latency, with ddr3 1600 you can get ram with a cas of 9 for the same price.
  7. bignastyid said:
    miki77miki said:
    MasterMace said:
    When you list out a build here, folks will exclude software and periphs from build costs, as it adds an entirely new aspect to it, as such, a build will consist of the case and any hardware inside of it, as well as (in the enthusiast market) any cooling devices that lead out of the case (like radiators). In this case, they'd exclude the monitor. You're looking at an $880 build with this.

    In addition, you should specify what the build is for, I'm going to assume gaming.

    That being said, I normally recommend your build have 45-60% of your budget placed on your performance parts - that is, your CPU and Graphics, with your graphics being 2x the amount of your CPU, making it 15-20% on the CPU, 30-40% on the graphics. The second part to pick is your PSU. Make sure that you're sticking with the current generation of RAM - DDR4 - it helps you future-proof. Once you're past the $500 budget mark, there's no point with downgrading to DDR3. Below it, you might need DDR3 to fit your budget.

    Regarding your build, you should go with a Skylake CPU (6000 series). Your current graphics card is fine. Your current PSU is fine.



    MasterMace said:
    When you list out a build here, folks will exclude software and periphs from build costs, as it adds an entirely new aspect to it, as such, a build will consist of the case and any hardware inside of it, as well as (in the enthusiast market) any cooling devices that lead out of the case (like radiators). In this case, they'd exclude the monitor. You're looking at an $880 build with this.

    In addition, you should specify what the build is for, I'm going to assume gaming.

    That being said, I normally recommend your build have 45-60% of your budget placed on your performance parts - that is, your CPU and Graphics, with your graphics being 2x the amount of your CPU, making it 15-20% on the CPU, 30-40% on the graphics. The second part to pick is your PSU. Make sure that you're sticking with the current generation of RAM - DDR4 - it helps you future-proof. Once you're past the $500 budget mark, there's no point with downgrading to DDR3. Below it, you might need DDR3 to fit your budget.

    Regarding your build, you should go with a Skylake CPU (6000 series). Your current graphics card is fine. Your current PSU is fine.


    Okay, so then how does this look?
    PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/NPMcXL
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/NPMcXL/by_merchant/

    CPU: Intel Core i5-6600 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($215.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-B150M-D3H DDR3 Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($75.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Memory: Kingston HyperX Fury Black 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($42.89 @ SuperBiiz)
    Storage: Samsung 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($84.89 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($45.89 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: MSI Radeon R9 390 8GB Video Card ($313.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Micro Center)
    Power Supply: Antec EarthWatts Green 650W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($66.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Monitor: Asus VE247H 23.6" Monitor ($115.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1012.60
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-10-24 12:24 EDT-0400


    Ram is high latency, with ddr3 1600 you can get ram with a cas of 9 for the same price.


    Is there any other RAM you would suggest? Because from what i've researched the hyper X fury seems to be the best out of all of them.
  8. PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1231 V3 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($242.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock H97 PRO4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($83.89 @ OutletPC)
    Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($36.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Samsung 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($84.89 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.33 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: Sapphire Radeon R9 390 8GB Nitro Video Card ($318.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: NZXT S340 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Micro Center)
    Power Supply: EVGA 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
    Monitor: Asus VE247H 23.6" Monitor ($115.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1056.04
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-10-24 13:54 EDT-0400

    the 1231v3 and i5-6600 have about the same single core performance but the xeon has 15-20% hyper threading advantage. i change your power supply, ram, case, and gpu around. but you could mix match back and forth between your original build if you want.
  9. bignastyid said:


    Ram is high latency, with ddr3 1600 you can get ram with a cas of 9 for the same price.


    You are misinformed. Here's an article from 7 years ago addressing it.

    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ddr3-1333-speed-latency-shootout,1754-3.html

    Quote:
    Consider the latency ratings of the three most recent memory formats: Upper-midrange DDR-333 was rated at CAS 2; similar-market DDR2-667 was rated at CAS 4 and today's middle DDR3-1333 is often rated at CAS 8. Most people would be shocked to learn that these vastly different rated timings result in the same actual response time, which is specifically 12 nanoseconds.

    Because cycle time is the inverse of clock speed (1/2 of DDR data rates), the DDR-333 reference clock cycled every six nanoseconds, DDR2-667 every three nanoseconds and DDR3-1333 every 1.5 nanoseconds. Latency is measured in clock cycles, and two 6ns cycles occur in the same time as four 3ns cycles or eight 1.5ns cycles. If you still have your doubts, do the math!

    The problem perceived by many less-informed buyers is that faster memory responds more slowly, but it's obvious from these examples that this simply isn't often the case. The real problem isn't that response times are getting slower, but instead that they've failed to get quicker! When we see astronomical "speeds," we hope that our entire systems will become "more responsive" as a result. Yet, memory latencies are one place where things really haven't changed much.



    There's no reason to downgrade to DDR3 RAM. Stick with a DDR4 platform, when the better RAM comes out, you can always swap out the sticks.
  10. MasterMace said:
    bignastyid said:


    Ram is high latency, with ddr3 1600 you can get ram with a cas of 9 for the same price.


    You are misinformed. Here's an article from 7 years ago addressing it.

    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ddr3-1333-speed-latency-shootout,1754-3.html

    Quote:
    Consider the latency ratings of the three most recent memory formats: Upper-midrange DDR-333 was rated at CAS 2; similar-market DDR2-667 was rated at CAS 4 and today's middle DDR3-1333 is often rated at CAS 8. Most people would be shocked to learn that these vastly different rated timings result in the same actual response time, which is specifically 12 nanoseconds.

    Because cycle time is the inverse of clock speed (1/2 of DDR data rates), the DDR-333 reference clock cycled every six nanoseconds, DDR2-667 every three nanoseconds and DDR3-1333 every 1.5 nanoseconds. Latency is measured in clock cycles, and two 6ns cycles occur in the same time as four 3ns cycles or eight 1.5ns cycles. If you still have your doubts, do the math!

    The problem perceived by many less-informed buyers is that faster memory responds more slowly, but it's obvious from these examples that this simply isn't often the case. The real problem isn't that response times are getting slower, but instead that they've failed to get quicker! When we see astronomical "speeds," we hope that our entire systems will become "more responsive" as a result. Yet, memory latencies are one place where things really haven't changed much.



    There's no reason to downgrade to DDR3 RAM. Stick with a DDR4 platform, when the better RAM comes out, you can always swap out the sticks.


    I feel sticking with DDR3-1600 is fine because there are a couple real world tests that show there is very little diffrence between ddr3 and ddr4
  11. MasterMace said:
    bignastyid said:


    Ram is high latency, with ddr3 1600 you can get ram with a cas of 9 for the same price.


    You are misinformed. Here's an article from 7 years ago addressing it.

    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ddr3-1333-speed-latency-shootout,1754-3.html

    Quote:
    Consider the latency ratings of the three most recent memory formats: Upper-midrange DDR-333 was rated at CAS 2; similar-market DDR2-667 was rated at CAS 4 and today's middle DDR3-1333 is often rated at CAS 8. Most people would be shocked to learn that these vastly different rated timings result in the same actual response time, which is specifically 12 nanoseconds.

    Because cycle time is the inverse of clock speed (1/2 of DDR data rates), the DDR-333 reference clock cycled every six nanoseconds, DDR2-667 every three nanoseconds and DDR3-1333 every 1.5 nanoseconds. Latency is measured in clock cycles, and two 6ns cycles occur in the same time as four 3ns cycles or eight 1.5ns cycles. If you still have your doubts, do the math!

    The problem perceived by many less-informed buyers is that faster memory responds more slowly, but it's obvious from these examples that this simply isn't often the case. The real problem isn't that response times are getting slower, but instead that they've failed to get quicker! When we see astronomical "speeds," we hope that our entire systems will become "more responsive" as a result. Yet, memory latencies are one place where things really haven't changed much.



    There's no reason to downgrade to DDR3 RAM. Stick with a DDR4 platform, when the better RAM comes out, you can always swap out the sticks.


    How am I misinformed? ddr3 1600 with a cas of 10 is going to be a little slower than ddr3 1600 with a cas of 9. Is the difference going to be substantial? No, but why get the slight slower ram when slightly faster ram is the same price?
  12. Main post has been updated for anyone that wants to give some advice, PSU has been changed to a higher teir one for less price and the RAM has been changed to a lower latency one at around the same price.
  13. miki77miki said:
    Main post has been updated for anyone that wants to give some advice, PSU has been changed to a higher teir one for less price and the RAM has been changed to a lower latency one at around the same price.


    You went backwards on the PSU the Antec was tier 2 the Evga g1 is tier 4. The Evga G2s are the tier 1 units
  14. if you go with the i5 6500, it is $175 on tigerdirect until midnight tonight with visa promo. Otherwise $199.
    http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=9788450&csid=_61

    EDIT: Just realized you have the i5 6600 in your build. $195 for same promo:
    http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=9788454&CatId=8732
  15. naturesninja said:
    if you go with the i5 6500, it is $175 on tigerdirect until midnight tonight with visa promo. Otherwise $199.
    http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=9788450&csid=_61

    EDIT: Just realized you have the i5 6600 in your build. $195 for same promo:
    http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=9788454&CatId=8732


    Thanks for the tip!
  16. bignastyid said:
    miki77miki said:
    Main post has been updated for anyone that wants to give some advice, PSU has been changed to a higher teir one for less price and the RAM has been changed to a lower latency one at around the same price.


    You went backwards on the PSU the Antec was tier 2 the Evga g1 is tier 4. The Evga G2s are the tier 1 units


    Wow, I can't believe I missed that. It's fixed now, what do you think?
  17. miki77miki said:
    bignastyid said:
    miki77miki said:
    Main post has been updated for anyone that wants to give some advice, PSU has been changed to a higher teir one for less price and the RAM has been changed to a lower latency one at around the same price.


    You went backwards on the PSU the Antec was tier 2 the Evga g1 is tier 4. The Evga G2s are the tier 1 units


    Wow, I can't believe I missed that. It's fixed now, what do you think?


    Much better psu.
  18. bignastyid said:
    miki77miki said:
    bignastyid said:
    miki77miki said:
    Main post has been updated for anyone that wants to give some advice, PSU has been changed to a higher teir one for less price and the RAM has been changed to a lower latency one at around the same price.


    You went backwards on the PSU the Antec was tier 2 the Evga g1 is tier 4. The Evga G2s are the tier 1 units


    Wow, I can't believe I missed that. It's fixed now, what do you think?


    Much better psu.


    Thanks!
  19. Best answer
    MasterMace said:


    How am I misinformed? ddr3 1600 with a cas of 10 is going to be a little slower than ddr3 1600 with a cas of 9. Is the difference going to be substantial? No, but why get the slight slower ram when slightly faster ram is the same price?


    You gave a massive quote leading back to my post, thus referencing the DDR4 I am recommending. If you intended to refer to the OP's current DDR3, it was lost in the massive quote. You could instead have quoted the original post with the DDR3 RAM.

    Quote:

    I feel sticking with DDR3-1600 is fine because there are a couple real world tests that show there is very little diffrence between ddr3 and ddr4


    You might feel right now that the difference is minimal, in the same way people did from DDR2->DDR3, and the same way people did from DDR->DDR2, but you're going to find that the DDR4 RAM is going to improve, and you will not want to have to buy a new motherboard to upgrade your RAM.

    To reiterate since it seems lost, I am saying to buy a DDR4 platform (motherboard) to be upgradable.
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