Solved

Can I run a GTX960 on my existing HP Envy 700-49?

Hello - Thank you for any help provided.

Can I run this GTX 960 GPU - https://www.asus.com/Graphics-Cards/STRIXGTX960DC2OC2GD5/specifications/

Or would it be a smarter choice to get GTX 750 TI OC - https://www.asus.com/Graphics-Cards/STRIXGTX750TIOC2GD5/specifications/

My Computer is exactly this premade HP - http://h20564.www2.hp.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?docId=c03824636

It has 12Gig Ram, quad i7 3770 3.4, no extra power draws.

Power Supply is - http://www.ascendtech.us/hp-envy-700-633187-002-460w-power-supply_i_pshp460w6331872.aspx

I have 1 6 pin PCIe free.

I'm not looking to upgrade the comp past the best graphics card it can currently run.
Note: Another reason the GTX 750 would be a safe choice is I can buy it locally and if does not work with my prebuilt HP I can return to store for refund.

Tks for reading
5 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about run gtx960 existing envy 700
  1. This is the reason why people hate Branded computers (Including me)
    You can't fit anything in the things!

    I doubt youll be able to fit the gpu in unfortunately :/ Unless it has 1 fan.

    Even if you do manage to get it in I don't think you would get the correct airflow.

    On your computer's page
    http://h20564.www2.hp.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?docId=c03824636

    You'll be able to fit a gpu around the size of that.
    (Radeon HD 8570)
    16.7 cm x 6.8 cm (6.6 in x 2.7 in)

    The GTX 960 and GTX 750TI are
    21.52 x 12.12 x 4.09 Centimeters

    Also another thing is the pci express on your motherboard is 2.0 not 3.0 (which the recommended requirements are on the GTX 960) it will still work but the performance will be decreased

    For reference here is the inside of your pc
    http://core0.staticworld.net/images/article/2013/07/1253503_sr_1160-100047023-orig.jpg
  2. LogansRun said:
    Hello - Thank you for any help provided.

    Can I run this GTX 960 GPU - https://www.asus.com/Graphics-Cards/STRIXGTX960DC2OC2GD5/specifications/

    Or would it be a smarter choice to get GTX 750 TI OC - https://www.asus.com/Graphics-Cards/STRIXGTX750TIOC2GD5/specifications/

    My Computer is exactly this premade HP - http://h20564.www2.hp.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?docId=c03824636

    It has 12Gig Ram, quad i7 3770 3.4, no extra power draws.

    Power Supply is - http://www.ascendtech.us/hp-envy-700-633187-002-460w-power-supply_i_pshp460w6331872.aspx

    I have 1 6 pin PCIe free.

    I'm not looking to upgrade the comp past the best graphics card it can currently run.
    Note: Another reason the GTX 750 would be a safe choice is I can buy it locally and if does not work with my prebuilt HP I can return to store for refund.

    Tks for reading


    As mentioned above, size is an issue when upgrading OEM machines, however after looking at a few pictures of your computer I can safely say that there appears to be enough room to fit a GTX 960, as long as it isn't something like the gigabyte triple fan version:



    However, there is another problem. The GTX 960 requires a 450W PSU, and OEM machines rarely output the wattage that they list. Therefore, they are dangerous to use with enthusiast graphics cards such as the GTX 960, so before you upgrade the GPU you will have to also get a new PSU.

    Fortunately, your HP is quite different from the norm, and has a standard power supply. This is good news, because it means that you can replace the power supply with something like this: Click Here.

    Airflow is a concern in an OEM case like yours, but since the PSU I recommended is modular, which means you can disconnect any unnecessary cables, and with a bit of rough cable management, it shouldn't be a problem, especially since the GTX 960 is a very efficient card, and does not emit much heat.

    Disregard the comment about PCI-E 2.0 above, it will cause a maximum of 1-2 FPS reduction, since modern cards are yet to saturate PCI-E 2.0.

    Also, you mean you have 1 PCI-E x16 free, right?

    Finally, if you can't afford to upgrade the PSU right now, then the GTX 750 ti is your best bet, it will fit in your system no problem, and the version below doesn't need extra power. However, if you are looking to play next gen games like GTA V or Skyrim for example, there is quite a difference in performance between the two. Don't be afraid about upgrading the PSU, it isn't that hard at all!!

    GTX 750 ti : Click Here.

    GTX 960: Click Here.
  3. Best answer
    Chayan4400 said:
    LogansRun said:
    Hello - Thank you for any help provided.

    Can I run this GTX 960 GPU - https://www.asus.com/Graphics-Cards/STRIXGTX960DC2OC2GD5/specifications/

    Or would it be a smarter choice to get GTX 750 TI OC - https://www.asus.com/Graphics-Cards/STRIXGTX750TIOC2GD5/specifications/

    My Computer is exactly this premade HP - http://h20564.www2.hp.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?docId=c03824636

    It has 12Gig Ram, quad i7 3770 3.4, no extra power draws.

    Power Supply is - http://www.ascendtech.us/hp-envy-700-633187-002-460w-power-supply_i_pshp460w6331872.aspx

    I have 1 6 pin PCIe free.

    I'm not looking to upgrade the comp past the best graphics card it can currently run.
    Note: Another reason the GTX 750 would be a safe choice is I can buy it locally and if does not work with my prebuilt HP I can return to store for refund.

    Tks for reading


    As mentioned above, size is an issue when upgrading OEM machines, however after looking at a few pictures of your computer I can safely say that there appears to be enough room to fit a GTX 960, as long as it isn't something like the gigabyte triple fan version:



    However, there is another problem. The GTX 960 requires a 450W PSU, and OEM machines rarely output the wattage that they list. Therefore, they are dangerous to use with enthusiast graphics cards such as the GTX 960, so before you upgrade the GPU you will have to also get a new PSU.

    Fortunately, your HP is quite different from the norm, and has a standard power supply. This is good news, because it means that you can replace the power supply with something like this: Click Here.

    Airflow is a concern in an OEM case like yours, but since the PSU I recommended is modular, which means you can disconnect any unnecessary cables, and with a bit of rough cable management, it shouldn't be a problem, especially since the GTX 960 is a very efficient card, and does not emit much heat.

    Disregard the comment about PCI-E 2.0 above, it will cause a maximum of 1-2 FPS reduction, since modern cards are yet to saturate PCI-E 2.0.

    Also, you mean you have 1 PCI-E x16 free, right?

    Finally, if you can't afford to upgrade the PSU right now, then the GTX 750 ti is your best bet, it will fit in your system no problem, and the version below doesn't need extra power. However, if you are looking to play next gen games like GTA V or Skyrim for example, there is quite a difference in performance between the two. Don't be afraid about upgrading the PSU, it isn't that hard at all!!

    GTX 750 ti : Click Here.

    GTX 960: Click Here.


    It would be a tight fit although the GPU will generate heat very quickly which is not a good thing.
  4. Yes, it won't be as roomy as a custom build but it certainly is possible. The 960 is not a card prone to overheating because It is so power efficient, In fact I haven't seen one case of a 960 overheating on this forum.

    To the OP: for the most optimum cooling, get the asus turbo version of the 960:

    http://www.amazon.com/Asus-TURBO-GTX960-OC-2GD5-ASUS-Graphics-Cards/dp/B00WJOU6RM (Copy paste the link,)

    It sounds counterintuitive, I know, but that version expels all waste air outside the case, leading to lower ambient temps inside the case.
  5. Chayan4400 said:
    LogansRun said:
    Hello - Thank you for any help provided.

    Can I run this GTX 960 GPU - https://www.asus.com/Graphics-Cards/STRIXGTX960DC2OC2GD5/specifications/

    Or would it be a smarter choice to get GTX 750 TI OC - https://www.asus.com/Graphics-Cards/STRIXGTX750TIOC2GD5/specifications/

    My Computer is exactly this premade HP - http://h20564.www2.hp.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?docId=c03824636

    It has 12Gig Ram, quad i7 3770 3.4, no extra power draws.

    Power Supply is - http://www.ascendtech.us/hp-envy-700-633187-002-460w-power-supply_i_pshp460w6331872.aspx

    I have 1 6 pin PCIe free.

    I'm not looking to upgrade the comp past the best graphics card it can currently run.
    Note: Another reason the GTX 750 would be a safe choice is I can buy it locally and if does not work with my prebuilt HP I can return to store for refund.

    Tks for reading


    As mentioned above, size is an issue when upgrading OEM machines, however after looking at a few pictures of your computer I can safely say that there appears to be enough room to fit a GTX 960, as long as it isn't something like the gigabyte triple fan version:



    However, there is another problem. The GTX 960 requires a 450W PSU, and OEM machines rarely output the wattage that they list. Therefore, they are dangerous to use with enthusiast graphics cards such as the GTX 960, so before you upgrade the GPU you will have to also get a new PSU.

    Fortunately, your HP is quite different from the norm, and has a standard power supply. This is good news, because it means that you can replace the power supply with something like this: Click Here.

    Airflow is a concern in an OEM case like yours, but since the PSU I recommended is modular, which means you can disconnect any unnecessary cables, and with a bit of rough cable management, it shouldn't be a problem, especially since the GTX 960 is a very efficient card, and does not emit much heat.

    Disregard the comment about PCI-E 2.0 above, it will cause a maximum of 1-2 FPS reduction, since modern cards are yet to saturate PCI-E 2.0.

    Also, you mean you have 1 PCI-E x16 free, right?

    Finally, if you can't afford to upgrade the PSU right now, then the GTX 750 ti is your best bet, it will fit in your system no problem, and the version below doesn't need extra power. However, if you are looking to play next gen games like GTA V or Skyrim for example, there is quite a difference in performance between the two. Don't be afraid about upgrading the PSU, it isn't that hard at all!!

    GTX 750 ti : Click Here.

    GTX 960: Click Here.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Hello Chayan4400 and Cazauxx,

    Thank you very much for freely sharing your time and knowledge.

    Your input has made me lean toward the GTX750 TI as a safer choice because it is more likely to work in my comp with out issues.

    But wanted to respond to your messages and ask for 1 follow up clarification.
    - The Turbo GTX 960 looked like a very intersting option because it pushes the heat out side the computer.

    To follow up your question I do have the 16 pinn connector free when I remove the other GPU, but I also have a free 6 pinn PCIe power connecter hanging free, un-used in my computer that was not needed with the manufacturer build. It is one of the reasons I hoped I could use the GTX 960 with my existing PSU.

    THE PSU I have is advertised as 460W, and I have 1 6PINN PCIe plug, and the GTX 960 versions I have been looking at are advertised as needing 150W power consumption and Minimum system of 400W and only need 1 6PINN PCIe plug.
    https://www.asus.com/Graphics-Cards/TURBOGTX960OC2GD5/specifications/
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1147786-REG/asus_turbo_gtx960_oc_2gd5_turbo_geforce_gtx960_graphics.html

    GTX960s above these are advertised as needing more system Watts and more power connectors.

    From what I think you are saying is it is likely my PSU will perform below 460W and the GPUs discussed above 400W likely leading to conflict?

    For me, I would have to buy the GTX 960 online and a return for refund would be difficult if it just barely failed to work even though advertising indicates it would be ok.
    I could buy a GTX 750 locally and get a refund if there were issues, down side being a significantly weaker GPU.

    Tks for all your help
Ask a new question

Read More

Gtx Hewlett Packard Components