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4690k 24/7 overclock : max safe voltage and temperature

Hi guys, I am currently messing around with my cpu trying to achieve different clocks.

My question is, what is the maximum voltage and temperature limit for haswell chips for an safe, everyday overclock?

I know that this question has been covered in many threads but I can't seem to find any consensual limits in the overclocking community.

I have read various statements saying that the max safe voltage should be under 1.25v, others says under 1.3v, others under 1.345v and some people also say that any voltage under 1.5v is just fine as long as the temperature is good.

This leaves me confused because I am seeking to acheive the highest clock possible, while being able to keep that chip working for at least 5 years.

My current overclock setting 4.5Ghz at 1.229v and my maximum temperature under 100% load is 60C.

My chip is a 4690k cooled by a Noctua NH-D14, my motherboard is an Asus Z97-A, powered by Corsair HX850.

What are your thoughts about this infamous question? Should I keep this ultra safe configuration for an everyday usage or could I push it further without risking to see the chip die within the next couple years?

Thank you in advance for your time and your help!
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More about 4690k overclock max safe voltage temperature
  1. EDITED (for grammar ,or rather poor grammar)From skimming through your post it seems as though you have a good handle on what voltages work for you, also you're more likely to get in depth voltage discussions over at overclock.net . Numerous haswell temperature threads and guides.

    With that out of the way, i do not believe there is a number or numeric value for the max voltage on haswell cpus, at least Intel does not provide one. Your numbers are good. Like any semiconductor technology voltage and heat over time kills processors. Some use extreme cooling methods to counter the heat from higher voltages , around 1.4v . I am not a advocate of that. A good CPU cooler is essential regardless, you have one of the best heatsink/fan coolers available. With that, in your case, I believe if the weather is right you would hit the processor unstable frequency before overheating it. (colder than normal ambient temps)
    I cannot say for certain of the exact numbers , but i can say Haswell is to Ivy Bridge in what Ivy Bridge is to Sandy Bridge. By that i meant by applying voltages just a shade to high and you shall see the temps rise noticeably. Sandy Bridge was more forgiving in this respect.

    To end this rant , in my honest opinion your CPU is going to be running fine for a long time at that current setting.
    Note: I like to switch between offset and manual. Though there is some additional tweaks that come along with that,im sure you know .

    Here are some threads if you don't already have a profile for overclock.net

    http://www.overclock.net/t/1411077/haswell-overclocking-guide-with-statistics

    http://www.overclock.net/t/1401976/the-gigabyte-z87-haswell-overclocking-oc-guide

    http://www.overclock.net/t/1522163/z97-a-and-i4790k-oc-guide-for-a-newbie
  2. Samuel Charlebois,

    The accepted consensus according to many hardware evaluators, writers and overclockers here at Tom's, as well as at other websites, with respect to 22 nanometer processors, is to keep it under 1.300 Vcore and 80C.

    Here's a brief explanation and short table showing how voltage decreases with each Die shrink:

    Excessive Vcore and temperatures will result in accelerated "Electromigration" - https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=Electromigration - which prematurely erodes the traces and junctions within the processor's layers and nano-circuits. This will eventually result in blue-screen crashes, which will become increasingly frequent over time.

    CPU's become more susceptible to Electromigration with each Die-shrink, so smaller architectures are least tolerant of over-volting. Nevertheless, Vcore settings should not exceed the following:

    -> Core 2

    1st. Generation 65 Nanometer ... 1.50 Vcore
    2nd Generation 45 Nanometer ... 1.40 Vcore

    -> Core i

    1st. Generation 45 Nanometer ... 1.40 Vcore
    2nd Generation 32 Nanometer ... 1.35 Vcore
    3rd Generation 22 Nanometer ... 1.30 Vcore
    4th Generation 22 Nanometer ... 1.30 Vcore
    5th Generation 14 Nanometer ... 1.25 Vcore

    Here's the normal operating range for Core temperature:

    80C Hot (100% Load)
    75C Warm
    70C Warm (Heavy Load)
    60C Norm
    50C Norm (Medium Load)
    40C Norm
    30C Cool (Idle)

    Please read this Tom’s Sticky:

    Intel Temperature Guide - http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-1800828/intel-temperature-guide.html

    CT :sol:
  3. Thanks a lot to both answers!

    I can acheive 4.6Ghz at 1.3v with temperatures under 65C at 100% load.

    So, from what I understand from CompuTronix's answer is that even though my temperature are very good and could be higher without it being risky for the chip, I have reached the voltage limit and if I push it higher than this, it will most likely result in a premature degredation of the CPU. The voltage will erode the CPU even if it's not that hot.

    Am I understanding right?

    Thanks!
  4. Yes, however, please define "100% load".
  5. 100% load would be : the load under Prime95 26.6 Small FFT stress test. 68C max after 2h running
  6. That's the correct test for establishing your thermal baseline Core temperatures.

    What is your ambient temperature?
  7. I am curious as to what CPU cooler you are using
  8. Ambient temperature of the room is 21C with good AC circulation
  9. ishaqwaheed said:
    I am curious as to what CPU cooler you are using


    I am cooling my cpu with a Noctua NH-D14 and the Indigo XS thermal interface.
  10. temperature is a reference value for Intel’s Thermal Specifications.,

    Just hover your mouse over my avatar to see my full system specs.

    Samuel Charlebois,

    Standard ambient temperature is 22C or (72F), which is normal room temperature. Ambient temperature is a reference value for Intel’s Thermal Specifications. Since you're only 1C lower than normal, your ambient temperature is not a determining factor in your Core temperatures.

    What utility are you using to measure your Core temperatures?
  11. CompuTronix said:
    Just hover your mouse over my avatar to see my full system specs.

    Standard ambient temperature is 22C or (72F), which is normal room temperature. Ambient temperature is a reference value for Intel’s Thermal Specifications. Since you're only 1C lower than normal, your ambient temperature is not a determining factor in your Core temperatures.

    What utility are you using to measure your Core temperatures?


    I am using Real Temp 3.70
  12. Best answer
    Perfect.

    Real Temp was developed specifically for Intel processors, is acknowledged by Intel, and is a know accurate and trusted monitoring utility for Core temperatures.

    The NH-D14 is an excellent high-end air cooler. I think your rig is very well tweaked and has ample thermal headroom for higher ambient temperatures.

    It seems like you're familiar with the Guide I linked above. Have you read it? If you haven't, then please do.
  13. CompuTronix said:
    Perfect.

    Real Temp was developed specifically for Intel processors, is acknowledged by Intel, and is a know accurate and trusted monitoring utility for Core temperatures.

    The NH-D14 is an excellent high-end air cooler. I think your rig is very well tweaked and has ample thermal headroom for higher ambient temperatures.

    It seems like you're familiar with the Guide I linked above. Have you read it? If you haven't done so, then please do.


    Indeed, I have read it thoroughly before I opening this thread.

    Thank you for your time and your help.
  14. Enjoy your rig ... and if no one has yet said so, welcome to Tom's! :D

    CT :sol:
  15. Not to say there is no threads or discussions that happen here at Tom's Hardware. because there is, but i only meant to add more threads in hope one will comb through thread after thread and fine the "needle in a haystack" or the answer that suits your needs best. The temps guide here is referenced many times across multiple forums , perhaps due to it being unambiguous as to the topic. Good info.
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