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Theoretical Mini Fridge PC

Now I know it is impossible to have a PC under normal circumstances running inside a refrigerator unit, hence the theoretical PC. What if you had all your components water cooled with tubing leading out of the PC through an air tight hole to a radiator outside the PC? Would this effectively help with cooling enough to keep the temperatures low? Or would the compressor in the refrigerator fail due to high heat? This is the only way I could think of having a PC of this nature work, but it would require every single piece of hardware that gives off heat to be water cooled. This in theory would have heat brought out of the system keeping ambient temperatures cool, and all of the components inside the PC would be kept at that fridge's temperature. I'd like to hear your thoughts on this whether you think it would be possible, or just fail. This was inspired by LinusTechTips new video about the topic. (Vessel Exclusive for 7 Days)

For the actual PC, I am thinking something like this, as it is very low TDP, and should in theory keep the heat down lower and easier to cool.
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel Core i5-4590S 3.0GHz Quad-Core Processor ($195.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-H97-D3H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($87.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Patriot Signature 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($39.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 850 EVO-Series 1TB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($337.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 960 2GB Video Card ($169.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Power Supply: Antec EarthWatts Green 380W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($38.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Other: Refridgerator
Total: $870.94
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-07-26 18:05 EDT-0400
11 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about theoretical mini fridge
  1. Essentially your concept is revolving around lowering ambient temperatures.
    So in theory, it is possible*.
    The colder the air through the radiators the more heat the interface (in this case liquid cooling) could handle. Of course you would have to deal with condensation, limitations of heat exchange (Thermal Paste, IHS, ETC)
  2. I want to build a 250 BTU air conditioner that fits the front 3.5 bay slots.... cool
  3. sure it is possible.
    back in the days (last millennium and the era of 266/300MHz celerons) people tried to cool their machines in various ways.
    so a jury rigged water cooling based off a engine water pump was fairly common and some of us even tried their luck with a fridge/freezer.
    there are a few things that you might want to address before starting such project, but all in all it will be fun to build a fridge computer.

    and btw - use only parts you are sure you can live without :D
  4. the water would freeze you would need anti frezze. and yeah abslotly it will keep temps down
    butt the refirgartoe unit will get very hot and

    look... a refigrator cant keep runnig 24/7 if its overheating you will need to find a way to cool it off .. thats a big fan that makes a lot of noise . and the ref motor makes a lot of noise by itself.

    its very high matinence and its not worth it.

    you will need a refirgartor guy to fix your cooling sytem . haha
  5. Didnt mean to pick as best answer -.-
  6. noisekiller said:
    the water would freeze you would need anti frezze. and yeah abslotly it will keep temps down
    butt the refirgartoe unit will get very hot and

    look... a refigrator cant keep runnig 24/7 if its overheating you will need to find a way to cool it off .. thats a big fan that makes a lot of noise . and the ref motor makes a lot of noise by itself.

    its very high matinence and its not worth it.

    you will need a refirgartor guy to fix your cooling sytem . haha


    Ok 1. A refrigerator does not take liquids down to freezing temperature.
    2. Again if the heat is being moved outside, and not directly into the system then in theory it should run fine.
    3. I said theoretical which means I don't plan on doing it, I was just suggesting an idea or "theory" that could possibly work.
  7. well, what's the fun of knowing stuff if you don't plan on trying it?

    heh, here are some general pointers:
    1st, you need to figure out how to get the cables out from the fridge without damaging the insulation very much
    (it is good thing to have the dvd rom and the psu on the fridge. also a good thing to consider are flat cables :D).
    2nd, the water condensation is a hard nut to crack
    (antistatic bag for a hdd helped a bit back in the day :D)
    3rd, the cooling should be considered too
    (as the heat dissipation of todays components is significantly higher than those from 15+ years ago)
  8. random stalker said:
    well, what's the fun of knowing stuff if you don't plan on trying it?

    heh, here are some general pointers:
    1st, you need to figure out how to get the cables out from the fridge without damaging the insulation very much
    (it is good thing to have the dvd rom and the psu on the fridge. also a good thing to consider are flat cables :D).
    2nd, the water condensation is a hard nut to crack
    (antistatic bag for a hdd helped a bit back in the day :D)
    3rd, the cooling should be considered too
    (as the heat dissipation of todays components is significantly higher than those from 15+ years ago)


    By, ( I don't plan on doing this) I mean I don't plan on doing this now, as I have too little experience to attempt it. From the sounds of it, we would need a system that was very power efficient, so it wouldn't produce to much heat.
  9. Also wouldn't an SSD make more sense than a standard hard drive, as cold temperatures will make it harder for normal hard drives to spin up.
  10. Best answer
    random stalker said:
    well, what's the fun of knowing stuff if you don't plan on trying it?

    heh, here are some general pointers:
    1st, you need to figure out how to get the cables out from the fridge without damaging the insulation very much
    (it is good thing to have the dvd rom and the psu on the fridge. also a good thing to consider are flat cables :D).
    2nd, the water condensation is a hard nut to crack
    (antistatic bag for a hdd helped a bit back in the day :D)
    3rd, the cooling should be considered too
    (as the heat dissipation of todays components is significantly higher than those from 15+ years ago)


    I'm considering a method similar to this myself for my next build. I stumbled across a thread similar to this one a while back and one user said that he had tested this "theory" and found the refrigerator compressor can be kept at reasonable temps with constant heat intake by attaching heat sinks to the actual compressor combined with a small fan. As for condensation if you mounted the rig inside the fridge you could theoretically make the door seal and everything else airtight and suck out all the oxygen to create a vacuum. Without any water-containing oxygen inside the fridge, there would be no condensation regardless of the surface temps, and if it needed service you could just turn off the pc and the fridge and wait for it to equalize with room temp, and then break the vacuum.
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