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How does a Peltier CPU cooling work?

I was looking into super cooling options and this came up. Apparently it is pretty well known and delivers super low temps. I read something about it making one side super hot, thereby making the other super cold. I under stand how heat exchange works, but I still don't get this. Is it good for high over clocked cpu's that run servers, because that is how I would want to use it.
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  1. It's very hit and miss. In theory it seems like it would be a great cooling solution, and you would wonder why this isn't used in more computer related applications. From my past understanding is that yes, one side gets frigid cold and the other blazing hot. First off, these Peltier coolers supposedly take a good bit of energy to run, and the hot side needs to stay hot so the cool side will stay cool. This effectively means that if you were to have a great heatsink on the hot side of the processor to cool it down, the cold side would not get as cold and warm up a bit.

    The next thing to consider is with something that may get that cold, you need to worry about condensation and make sure everything around the cooler is protected, I.E. board around the CPU. Some companies have these coolers figured out and have insulation around it to prevent this from happening.

    I recommend doing a little more research on this as I have thought about this myself and realized a cheaper water cooling solution would turn out way better in the long run.
  2. farnell121 said:
    It's very hit and miss. In theory it seems like it would be a great cooling solution, and you would wonder why this isn't used in more computer related applications. From my past understanding is that yes, one side gets frigid cold and the other blazing hot. First off, these Peltier coolers supposedly take a good bit of energy to run, and the hot side needs to stay hot so the cool side will stay cool. This effectively means that if you were to have a great heatsink on the hot side of the processor to cool it down, the cold side would not get as cold and warm up a bit.

    The next thing to consider is with something that may get that cold, you need to worry about condensation and make sure everything around the cooler is protected, I.E. board around the CPU. Some companies have these coolers figured out and have insulation around it to prevent this from happening.

    I recommend doing a little more research on this as I have thought about this myself and realized a cheaper water cooling solution would turn out way better in the long run.


    Well I wouldn't run it so high. I just want cold temps not below ambient. I just want to run load at ambient temperature. I am trying to get a cool 5ghertz clock from an i7 4960k.
  3. Best answer
    That depends on a lot of variables if you're looking to achieve a clock so high. Many enthusiasts will buy the most expensive cooling solutions to try and get a stable 5Ghz clock, but some may never reach it on their current processor. This is called playing the silicon lottery, and if you're able to get a CPU that will do a stable 5Ghz at all times this is called hitting the silicon jackpot. all CPU's are manufactured slightly differently and all the silicon and elements that go into making the wafer may not be distributed as evenly as others.

    You could probably shoot to achieve 5Ghz plus for a little while but the processor will more than likely not beable to run stable at this clock speed. There is a myriad of overclocking guides to see if your chip may be able to run steady at a temperature this high, and to find this out you can more than likely use the stock cooler. Here's a guide I suggest looking at to determine if your processor may be able to achieve such a high clock:

    http://www.overclockers.com/3step-guide-to-overclock-intel-haswell/

    Haswell CPU's generate way more heat than previous generation i series processors, more people running 2nd gen processors find that they are able to achieve 5Ghz more easily, but a Haswell CPU at 4.6Ghz has the same performance because it is built on newer technology. Some processors may only go to 4.4Ghz or 4.5Ghz stable while a very rare number may be able to even do 5.2+Ghz stable.

    I would test to see what your processor can do on the current cooling system at a lowered voltage to determine if you should dish out the money, and you may want to get a better cooling solution regardless! there's also another step you can do which will void the warranty but help reach your goal as Haswell chips don't have as good a TIM as previous generations. But I will state this again, it WILL void your warranty. Heres just an example guide but I know there are better ones out there:

    http://forum.hwbot.org/showthread.php?t=87965

    I just so happen to be starting my journey this week with my i5-4670k, and I have it idling close to room temperature at around 22-24 degrees Celsius with two 12v/0.9A fans running at full speed on a 120mmX120mm water cooled radiator. I'm going to up it to two 12v/1.6A fans today or tomorrow but running more than 12watts on the fan headers is not recommended unless your board is an enthusiast level that supports 24W per header, so I'm going to wire the red/black (power) wires directly to an attachable molex connector and the temperature and speed sensors to the fan headers.

    Also one other thing to take note of is the i7's, and particularly your Hex Core i7 generate more heat because of the HyperThreading I believe, so that's something to keep in mind! If you need any more info let me know, I was wanting to get one of those as they are pretty bad@$$ and I wish you luck on your journey!!!
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