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Watercooling - Tubing size: what diameter?

Hello guys,
I'm trying to set up my first custom loop (CPU + GPU with a Laing D5 pump).

I'm a little uncertain about tubing size:
what size do you suggest? What diameter, and why?

16/10 mm, 13/10 mm... or which?

Thanks!
Reply to Vectorized
5 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about watercooling tubing size diameter
  1. Best answer
    Personally I like large diameter tubing, for the sole reason of more waterflow. and in theory a slightly better cooling performance.

    I'd go with the 16/10mm unless your other components require a specific sized tubing.
    Reply to warhead0
  2. warhead0 said:
    Personally I like large diameter tubing, for the sole reason of more waterflow. and in theory a slightly better cooling performance.

    I'd go with the 16/10mm unless your other components require a specific sized tubing.



    Thank you very much!
    Reply to Vectorized
  3. warhead0 said:
    Personally I like large diameter tubing, for the sole reason of more waterflow. and in theory a slightly better cooling performance.

    I'd go with the 16/10mm unless your other components require a specific sized tubing.



    Larger tube inner diameter does NOT, I repeat does NOT change the flow rate through your loop whatsoever, when the fluid faces a tighter tube it will simply move faster to keep the flow rate constant, also the pump/fluid speed inside your loop even if sky high still does NOT improve cooling whatsoever, it's the size of the radiator, all facts mentioned can be proven easily through physics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer sciences
    Reply to madmax15
  4. madmax15 said:
    warhead0 said:
    Personally I like large diameter tubing, for the sole reason of more waterflow. and in theory a slightly better cooling performance.

    I'd go with the 16/10mm unless your other components require a specific sized tubing.



    Larger tube inner diameter does NOT, I repeat does NOT change the flow rate through your loop whatsoever, when the fluid faces a tighter tube it will simply move faster to keep the flow rate constant, also the pump/fluid speed inside your loop even if sky high still does NOT improve cooling whatsoever, it's the size of the radiator, all facts mentioned can be proven easily through physics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer sciences


    Alright, not sure why you would want to post in such an old topic, but you are incorrect on some of this information.

    Large Tube diameters will affect your flow rate and does require a pump to produce more pressure when there is more volume to move around. I know that the numbers are insignificant and can be down to margin of error, but it is still something to think about if you ask me.
    here's a forum of people discussing this exact issue and coming to a very similar conclusion:
    https://hardforum.com/threads/does-tubing-size-matter.1650109/
    and
    https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/13183-does-tubing-size-matter-and-whats-the-best/


    The pump/fluid speed absolutely affects your cooling performance. I don't even know why you would argue against this.
    see this video for a good example of exactly this: https://youtu.be/ttH0bnv0Gpk?t=364

    and yes, the radiators do play a big part in your cooling.
    Reply to warhead0
  5. warhead0 said:
    madmax15 said:
    warhead0 said:
    Personally I like large diameter tubing, for the sole reason of more waterflow. and in theory a slightly better cooling performance.

    I'd go with the 16/10mm unless your other components require a specific sized tubing.



    Larger tube inner diameter does NOT, I repeat does NOT change the flow rate through your loop whatsoever, when the fluid faces a tighter tube it will simply move faster to keep the flow rate constant, also the pump/fluid speed inside your loop even if sky high still does NOT improve cooling whatsoever, it's the size of the radiator, all facts mentioned can be proven easily through physics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer sciences


    Alright, not sure why you would want to post in such an old topic, but you are incorrect on some of this information.

    Large Tube diameters will affect your flow rate and does require a pump to produce more pressure when there is more volume to move around. I know that the numbers are insignificant and can be down to margin of error, but it is still something to think about if you ask me.
    here's a forum of people discussing this exact issue and coming to a very similar conclusion:
    https://hardforum.com/threads/does-tubing-size-matter.1650109/
    and
    https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/13183-does-tubing-size-matter-and-whats-the-best/


    The pump/fluid speed absolutely affects your cooling performance. I don't even know why you would argue against this.
    see this video for a good example of exactly this: https://youtu.be/ttH0bnv0Gpk?t=364

    and yes, the radiators do play a big part in your cooling.


    Okay first off let me say why I posted to a topic that was answered some 3 years ago, simply cause it's wrong, scientifically and technically wrong, I'm not pulling facts from my bum here I'm just a humble man with a bachelor degree in mechanical engineering, and if you didn't know that mechanical engineering has everything to do with heat/mass transfer, fluid mechanics, turbo machinery, engineering materials and every single other discipline that the companies actually require for the engineers designing their water/air cooling system then now you know, so bottom line I do know what I'm talking about, now that the prologue is over, let's break it down.

    the two links for the linus and hard forums actually prove your wrong not me, if you read long enough you will find a post in one of them saying it does not affect the flow rate, but forums out of the way tubing does NOT affect the flow rate of your loop, now I know it may seem wrong but trust me I've spent years studying this(or don't just pickup a text book about fluid mechanics and look up Bernoulli's equation), the idea is that the pump is the main and only source of power(or energy) to give to the fluid, tubing does not add energy but can reduce it significantly IF AND ONLY IF it's surface roughness is bad enough to cause obvious losses and it's definitely is not the case here, so if we are talking about tubing size, actually the smaller inner diameter actually gives less friction so it produces less overall losses, that's correct but only theoretically, in practice and especially in small tubes with very small diameter differences it would be practically impossible to measure the difference in losses between large and small inner diameter tubes

    now about the pump, I'm a huge fan of JayZ and I have watched the video you posted multiple times in the past, you need to understand that what he said "there is a lot of factors", that's very true, need to appreciate this statement to understand this, what happened with him was such a rare occasion and I think would rarely happen with someone else, now why is that, because the flow rate( directly affected and controlled by pump speed) that he set was actually so very slow that the fluid could not displace the humongous amount of heat generated by the 3-way SLI, and keep in mind this low flow rate is then divided by 3 for each card, which means that the cards were basically starved of cooling water, again it's a rare occasion and I can't see anyone using any speed close to this in their water cooling loops, if you really wanna know what happened in his case you need to calculate accurate flow rates through the cards, temps, and flow profile through the waterblocks, which means how is the fluid flowing through the waterblock because liquids basically behave very differently when you have changed the flow rate by that huge margin, also you can see this video: https://youtu.be/ghk-kWqUrpE?t=10m3s
    it's also JayZ, a little older video but try to watch till the end, He really explains how pump speed affects temps in most circumstances.

    now again, I'm only getting this from almost 5 years of studying from thick textbooks, you can refer to the fluid mechanics and heat transfer textbooks if you don't believe me.
    Reply to madmax15
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