Recommended pump for an extreme below ambient cooling system?

So I plan on building a system for below ambient cooling for extreme overclocking of my 9590 and dual 295x2 gpus Here's a diagram.



Blue: radiators.
Cyan: water chiller for 790W http://www.performance-pcs.com/hot-hailea-hc-500a-110v-1-2hp-790watt-cooling-capacity-waterchiller.html#Questions-Answers
Pinkish red: gpus
Light pink: cpu waterblock
Pink: Pump
Dark Blue: reservoir
Green: tubing

Here's my idea, the water chiller will chill Distilled water that will be sent to the cpu, warm water from there will be ran through a 360mm radiator before heading to the gpu's. from there it will be sent to my cooling tower under the desk (an empty case with a 420mm radiator and a 240mm or 360mm radiators, then to the pump and reservoir then back to the water chiller. I plan to set the water chiller as cold as I can without causing any condensation (somewhere in the 10c range maybe).

I want to build this cooling system to see how effective of a cooling solution it will be and to push overclocking without using liquid nitrogen.

What pump will be strong enough to run this?
8 answers Last reply
More about recommended pump extreme ambient cooling system
  1. I don't know about a single pump, but you could put two pumps in the loop; One in each case. Never heard of this being done...
  2. Any commonly available d5 or ddc pump should be able to handle this loop, however if you are worried about pressure, the mpc35 (or two) is quite powerful.
    Couple thoughts though. First, the rads and the chiller are going to be working at a cross purpose. If the chiller works, and cools the water below the ambient temperature in the room, the rads will actually serve to WARM the water. Rads function to bring the water temperature closer to ambient then it is. Under normal circumstances that cools the water since it has been warmed by water blocks, but in your case, they will serve warm the water as it is already colder then the temperature of the air.
    Second, have you considered what happens if the temperature you cool to is below the dew point? It isn't a temperature you can aim for because it isn't going to be 100 percent constant all the time. If it varies, and it will, you are going to end up with condensensation.
    Third, all of this is actually irrelevant because your chiller is hopelessly outmatched by the components in your system.
    You are looking at something like what, 1600 watts or so of heat? And your chiller is rated for like 500. So it won't have any effect at all really.
  3. I think Deuce65 already pin it all, laing D5 pump, u can use 2 if you like
    buy reservoir that have housing for 2 pumps can save lot of work, just remember always put reservoir before the pump..

    AFAIK the water temperature for entire loop usually same (couple deg difference) since it's constant moving..
    so the radiator may became useless,.. (conflicting with the chiller)
  4. Deuce65 said:
    Any commonly available d5 or ddc pump should be able to handle this loop, however if you are worried about pressure, the mpc35 (or two) is quite powerful.
    Couple thoughts though. First, the rads and the chiller are going to be working at a cross purpose. If the chiller works, and cools the water below the ambient temperature in the room, the rads will actually serve to WARM the water. Rads function to bring the water temperature closer to ambient then it is. Under normal circumstances that cools the water since it has been warmed by water blocks, but in your case, they will serve warm the water as it is already colder then the temperature of the air.
    Second, have you considered what happens if the temperature you cool to is below the dew point? It isn't a temperature you can aim for because it isn't going to be 100 percent constant all the time. If it varies, and it will, you are going to end up with condensensation.
    Third, all of this is actually irrelevant because your chiller is hopelessly outmatched by the components in your system.
    You are looking at something like what, 1600 watts or so of heat? And your chiller is rated for like 500. So it won't have any effect at all really.


    My idea is for the hot liquid from the pc to go to the radiators first to get rid of some of the heat, the now cooler water will go to the water chiller for further cooling, then go back to the pc, this way the radiators take away enough heat that the chiller should have no issue chilling the water. I might not take it down to 10c, maybe 20c instead as my room is roughly 30c.
  5. Naomi Kitsune said:
    My idea is for the hot liquid from the pc to go to the radiators first to get rid of some of the heat, the now cooler water will go to the water chiller for further cooling, then go back to the pc, this way the radiators take away enough heat that the chiller should have no issue chilling the water. I might not take it down to 10c, maybe 20c instead as my room is roughly 30c.


    Your idea is logical thinking but is not what will actually happen, the radiators will be counter productive against the chilled water created by the chiller, the rads will bring the water temperature up not down, my suggestion is to run 2 loops using D5 pumps as already suggested.

    http://www.performance-pcs.com/swiftech-mcp655-series-12-vdc-d5-water-pumps-with-speed-control.html

    Let the radiators cool the GPUs on a separate loop they will do just fine cooling the GPUs.

    Use the chiller loop to cool the CPU for below ambient cooling, but you will need an insulated reservoir to hold the chilled water.

    I considered the same thing exactly as you are, but the noise level of the chiller, and the fact it exhausts into the room were factors in my decision not to go that route.

    My goal was to replace the ice water I had already been cooling with, to get away from having to freeze the ice every day, so I considered the chiller, but stumbled upon another idea and pursued it instead.

    Which has now been in operation over 2 years and my present chilled water cooling solution.

    Which allows the 24/7 overclock you see in my CPU-Z validation.
  6. Ah yes, the Peltier loop. Ugly imo, but does a damn good job.
  7. 4Ryan6 said:
    Naomi Kitsune said:
    My idea is for the hot liquid from the pc to go to the radiators first to get rid of some of the heat, the now cooler water will go to the water chiller for further cooling, then go back to the pc, this way the radiators take away enough heat that the chiller should have no issue chilling the water. I might not take it down to 10c, maybe 20c instead as my room is roughly 30c.


    Your idea is logical thinking but is not what will actually happen, the radiators will be counter productive against the chilled water created by the chiller, the rads will bring the water temperature up not down, my suggestion is to run 2 loops using D5 pumps as already suggested.

    http://www.performance-pcs.com/swiftech-mcp655-series-12-vdc-d5-water-pumps-with-speed-control.html

    Let the radiators cool the GPUs on a separate loop they will do just fine cooling the GPUs.

    Use the chiller loop to cool the CPU for below ambient cooling, but you will need an insulated reservoir to hold the chilled water.

    I considered the same thing exactly as you are, but the noise level of the chiller, and the fact it exhausts into the room were factors in my decision not to go that route.

    My goal was to replace the ice water I had already been cooling with, to get away from having to freeze the ice every day, so I considered the chiller, but stumbled upon another idea and pursued it instead.

    Which has now been in operation over 2 years and my present chilled water cooling solution.

    Which allows the 24/7 overclock you see in my CPU-Z validation.



    Ok I see what you're saying. well to make things easier I'll use one liquid chiller for the cpu and for the gpus I'll stick with the build in liquid cooling as they are more than sufficient for decent overclocking. I'll use no radiators on the loop for the cpu, just the chiller set to about 20c
  8. Naomi Kitsune said:
    Ok I see what you're saying. well to make things easier I'll use one liquid chiller for the cpu and for the gpus I'll stick with the build in liquid cooling as they are more than sufficient for decent overclocking. I'll use no radiators on the loop for the cpu, just the chiller set to about 20c


    That setup will work very well for you. :)
Ask a new question

Read More

Overclocking GPUs Cooling Dual