I don't think my mobo can handle my RAM speed...

So I bought some more RAM so I could play GTA 5 more efficiently, since I only have 4 gb. As it turns out, my RAM speed is DDR3 2400 (PC3 19200)
My mobo only supports up to 2000MHz DDR3 (O.C.)
Will this be a problem?
18 answers Last reply
More about mobo handle ram speed
  1. From what I understand, your PC will auto clock the speed, to the boards required settings, I would recommend returning the RAM and getting a speed that your board supports, it may offer better results and be cheaper too.
  2. Not really, you should be able to run that memory at any speed between 800Mhz and 2400Mhz. When you plug it in it will likely default to 1333 anyway, you will have to set things manually if your system won't run them at their rated 2400 using XMP settings or the like.
  3. Eximo said:
    Not really, you should be able to run that memory at any speed between 800Mhz and 2400Mhz. When you plug it in it will likely default to 1333 anyway, you will have to set things manually if your system won't run them at their rated 2400 using XMP settings or the like.


    So I most likely won't have to send it back?
  4. Can confirm - the motherboard will downclock the memory to a speed it can handle.

    However, memory will only run as fast as its slowest module. For example, if you paired a DDR3-1600 module with a DDR3-2133 module (I do not recommend it), the board would downclock the 2133 to match the 1600 speed.

    The thing you should be careful about is the timings, as well as the voltages. If the timings or voltage on the two kits are different there will be problems.

    Even with this, nothing is guaranteed. If you bought two or more modules that are different from each other there's a chance your PC won't start, even if the timings and voltage are the same. DDR3 is finicky.

    When upgrading memory, you should always buy the exact same model as what's already installed, to minimize the chance of problems happening.
  5. jazzy663 said:
    Can confirm - the motherboard will downclock the memory to a speed it can handle.

    However, memory will only run as fast as its slowest module. For example, if you paired a DDR3-1600 module with a DDR3-2133 module (I do not recommend it), the board would downclock the 2133 to match the 1600 speed.

    The thing you should be careful about is the timings. If the timings on the two kits are different there will be problems.

    Even with this, nothing is guaranteed. If you bought two or more modules that are different from each other there's a chance your PC won't start, even if the timings are the same. DDR3 is finicky.

    When upgrading memory, you should always buy the exact same model as what's already installed, to minimize the chance of problems happening.


    Agreed
  6. jazzy663 said:
    Can confirm - the motherboard will downclock the memory to a speed it can handle.

    However, memory will only run as fast as its slowest module. For example, if you paired a DDR3-1600 module with a DDR3-2133 module (I do not recommend it), the board would downclock the 2133 to match the 1600 speed.

    The thing you should be careful about is the timings, as well as the voltages. If the timings or voltage on the two kits are different there will be problems.

    Even with this, nothing is guaranteed. If you bought two or more modules that are different from each other there's a chance your PC won't start, even if the timings and voltage are the same. DDR3 is finicky.

    When upgrading memory, you should always buy the exact same model as what's already installed, to minimize the chance of problems happening.


    So... Let's just say by some odd chance that the timings on the two sets of ram are different... I should take one set out?
  7. bingotj1 said:
    jazzy663 said:
    Can confirm - the motherboard will downclock the memory to a speed it can handle.

    However, memory will only run as fast as its slowest module. For example, if you paired a DDR3-1600 module with a DDR3-2133 module (I do not recommend it), the board would downclock the 2133 to match the 1600 speed.

    The thing you should be careful about is the timings, as well as the voltages. If the timings or voltage on the two kits are different there will be problems.

    Even with this, nothing is guaranteed. If you bought two or more modules that are different from each other there's a chance your PC won't start, even if the timings and voltage are the same. DDR3 is finicky.

    When upgrading memory, you should always buy the exact same model as what's already installed, to minimize the chance of problems happening.


    So... Let's just say by some odd chance that the timings on the two sets of ram are different... I should take one set out?


    If it causes problems (more than likely will), then yes. It would be sad if you had to do that.

    Can you link the currently installed memory, as well as what you recently bought? If you do that I can tell you if the timing + voltage is the same or not.
  8. jazzy663 said:
    bingotj1 said:
    jazzy663 said:
    Can confirm - the motherboard will downclock the memory to a speed it can handle.

    However, memory will only run as fast as its slowest module. For example, if you paired a DDR3-1600 module with a DDR3-2133 module (I do not recommend it), the board would downclock the 2133 to match the 1600 speed.

    The thing you should be careful about is the timings, as well as the voltages. If the timings or voltage on the two kits are different there will be problems.

    Even with this, nothing is guaranteed. If you bought two or more modules that are different from each other there's a chance your PC won't start, even if the timings and voltage are the same. DDR3 is finicky.

    When upgrading memory, you should always buy the exact same model as what's already installed, to minimize the chance of problems happening.


    So... Let's just say by some odd chance that the timings on the two sets of ram are different... I should take one set out?


    If it causes problems (more than likely will), then yes. It would be sad if you had to do that.

    Can you link the currently installed memory, as well as what you recently bought? If you do that I can tell you if the timing + voltage is the same or not.



    Currently Installed:
    http://
    Purchased:
    http://
  9. Oh boy. Those two kits each have different timings and different voltages.

    The Crucial Ballistix: 9-9-9-24, and 1.5v.
    The Ripjaws X: 11-13-13-31, and 1.65v.

    Chances are those two kits aren't going to play nice with each other.

    My suggestion would be to remove your Ballistix memory and install just the Ripjaws X. Luckily you bought an 8GB kit instead of a 4GB one, and 8GB is enough for most games, including GTA V.
  10. What CPU do you have so we have an idea of what you can run the new DRAM at
  11. Tradesman1 said:
    What CPU do you have so we have an idea of what you can run the new DRAM at


    I have an AMD FX 8250 overclocked to 4.0 Ghz
  12. 8350 maybe or 8150 (8150 maybe at 1866, 8350 might go 2133 if you can take the mobo that high - best bet with either is prob 1866 at 9-9-9-27 1.56
  13. Tradesman1 said:
    8350 maybe or 8150 (8150 maybe at 1866, 8350 might go 2133 if you can take the mobo that high - best bet with either is prob 1866 at 9-9-9-27 1.56


    So do I have to set the speed and whatnot myself?
  14. See if your mobo supports DOCP, EOCP or XMP if any of those can enable them and then select the 1866 profile, else need to set up manual
  15. Tradesman1 said:
    See if your mobo supports DOCP, EOCP or XMP if any of those can enable them and then select the 1866 profile, else need to set up manual


    I do not believe it supports any of those...
  16. What mobo is it?
  17. Tradesman1 said:
    What mobo is it?


    GIGABYTE GA-970A-D3
  18. Think it may have EOCP, if not needs to be set manually
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