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Does the I7 overclock better than the i5?

Just curious if this is so. Since I always see 4.8ghz-5.0ghz with 4790Ks while 4690K's I only see up to 4.8ghz at most.
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  1. Typically they do, but there are so many other variables involved in overclocking that it's hard to REALLY compare them fairly. The truth is, all chips are binned differently.
  2. Their slightly different architecture makes them moderately better on average. However like CT says, each chip ends up being slightly different compared to the next batch. Some OC better than others, others hit walls sooner.
    Example: My 965 runs 4.2 stable 40C max, and I have yet to speak with someone with similar results.
  3. Huh interesting. Just curious because most i5's including mine I usually see hit around 4.5-4.6ghz average while i7's hit 4.7-4.8ghz average.

    I have one more question, where can I see my CPU's batch number so I can see if anybody else has the same cpu from the same batch?
  4. I've always thought the i7's had a slightly higher clock speed when overclocked, likely due to being made from better binned chips than the i5's. It probably depends on the family but like with the latest devil's canyon it's more about how it's interpreted as a 'better' oc. The 4790k's do tend to reach 4.8-4.9ghz but their base stock is also 4 ghz with a turbo of 4.4 ghz. The 4690k i5 has a base stock of 3.5 ghz with a turbo up to 3.9ghz and still reaches 4.6-4.7 (or 4.4 to 4.8 depending on binning and roll of the dice). Given the i5 is rated 500mhz slower both at base and turbo compared to the i7 4790k yet when oc'd often comes with 200mhz I'd say the i5 overclocks a bit better in terms of gains. Max oc still goes to the i7, they just seem to have less headroom. I5's can gain up to around 800mhz over turbo, i7 gaining around 500mhz. The binning really is hit and miss but I think the averages are pretty right on.
  5. in theory the i5 should overclock better than the i7 since it would have a higher thermal bottleneck because hyper threading isnt creating more heat. but obviously above comments factor in. but in a real world scenario, an i7 with hyper threading turned off will overclock better than an i7 with hyper threading on. everyone turns off hyper threading in an overclocking competition... and the only real controllable physical difference between an i5 and an i7 silicon is the hyper threading.
  6. nikoli707 said:
    in theory the i5 should overclock better than the i7 since it would have a higher thermal bottleneck since hyper threading isnt creating more heat. but obviously above comments factor in. but in a real world scenario, an i7 with hyper threading turned off will overclock better than an i7 with hyper threading on.


    Make's sense, but it still is strange to me lol.

    How exactly are the intel Haswell CPU's created? Can intel somehow sort out which dies have better quality then put most of those die's toward i7 4790ks?
  7. Best answer
    All Haswell begin as one chip "sheet" and the worst binned chips become Celerons, then Pentiums, then i3s, etc... and then the best become i7s.
  8. CTurbo said:
    All Haswell begin as one chip "sheet" and the worst binned chips become Celerons, then Pentiums, then i3s, etc... and then the best become i7s.


    Well that makes perfect sense thank you! Speaking of Pentiums, I've seen lots of complaints of the G3258 because most of them need a lot of vcore to reach 4.5-4.8ghz.
  9. They're made on large round silicon wafers that look like large cd's or dvd's with the traces etched into them. If you ever look at one you can see a bunch of grid squares outlining each 'chip'. A microscope type device with a digital camera moves over them to verify all those tiny traces and I'm sure 'bins' them as it does so.

    http://img.hexus.net/v2/internationalevents/cebit2008/TS/Wednesday/Chips-big.jpg
  10. synphul said:
    They're made on large round silicon wafers that look like large cd's or dvd's with the traces etched into them. If you ever look at one you can see a bunch of grid squares outlining each 'chip'. A microscope type device with a digital camera moves over them to verify all those tiny traces and I'm sure 'bins' them as it does so.

    http://img.hexus.net/v2/internationalevents/cebit2008/TS/Wednesday/Chips-big.jpg


    Interesting. A friend of mine used to work at intel's chemical department and told me how they build the wafers. cool stuff.
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