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Confused about DRAM speeds, mobo and chipsets

Hi all,

Looking to build a new gaming pc and this is what i got so far.


case - Corsair Carbide 400R Black Mid Tower Case

motherboard either 1) ASRock Z97 Pro4 LGA1150 ATX Motherboard

2)ASRock Z97 Extreme6

3)ASRock Z97 Anniversary LGA1150 ATX

memory - G.SKILL TridentX 16GB (2x 8GB) DDR3 2400MHz

The main question is which chipset to get.

Looking to get one of the new i5's.

So the motherboards I am looking to get all support higher speeds ram. SO The ram i want to get is 2400Mhz. Want to get 16gb total (dual layer).

However will the chipsets support this speed standard? I mean I have read that even though the ram is 2400mhz it may only run at what the chip can handle i.e 1600mhz

Dont want to OC anything at the moment but still want to utilize the high speed of ram.

Can anyone reccomend which ram/chipset to get for these motherboards?

Hope I am making sense and not rambling

Thanks

Jay
3 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about confused dram speeds mobo chipsets
  1. Im afraid you will have to tweak them settings in the BIOS. not exactly overclocking.


    Getting the Trident X modules in and running at 2400MHz was as simple as point-and-click, with most of the secondary settings on auto. Tweaking them higher than 2400MHz was fairly simple with the timings relaxed. 2500MHz at 11-13-13-35 with the default 1.65 volts was possible, but try as I might, 2600MHz was a no go. Voltages of up to 1.75v would allow the modules to boot and POST, but fail as soon as a load was applied. Since 2600MHz was out, the challenge was to see where the modules could be tweaked and how they would respond. The maximum clock speed for this set was right over 2500MHz using latencies of 10-12-13-35 with an applied 1.72v. Adjusting the memory controller voltage to just under 1.10v was needed, along with the higher applied vdimm. At just over 100MHz, the gains were not huge, but the modules do show potential. With a $99 price tag, you can have modules that reach over 2400MHz — something not seen lately, as higher speed bins usually come with a hefty price premium.

    ----- source
    http://www.overclockersclub.com/reviews/gskill_trident_x/3.htm
  2. parthtrivedi said:
    Im afraid you will have to tweak them settings in the BIOS. not exactly overclocking.


    Getting the Trident X modules in and running at 2400MHz was as simple as point-and-click, with most of the secondary settings on auto. Tweaking them higher than 2400MHz was fairly simple with the timings relaxed. 2500MHz at 11-13-13-35 with the default 1.65 volts was possible, but try as I might, 2600MHz was a no go. Voltages of up to 1.75v would allow the modules to boot and POST, but fail as soon as a load was applied. Since 2600MHz was out, the challenge was to see where the modules could be tweaked and how they would respond. The maximum clock speed for this set was right over 2500MHz using latencies of 10-12-13-35 with an applied 1.72v. Adjusting the memory controller voltage to just under 1.10v was needed, along with the higher applied vdimm. At just over 100MHz, the gains were not huge, but the modules do show potential. With a $99 price tag, you can have modules that reach over 2400MHz — something not seen lately, as higher speed bins usually come with a hefty price premium.

    ----- source
    http://www.overclockersclub.com/reviews/gskill_trident_x/3.htm


    Hi,

    Thanks for your reply.

    Its costing me about AUD$230 for the 16gb ram @2400mhz. Do you recon it would be better to get a lower speed and then try tweaking it to get higher speeds? is it safe in the long run for the memory?

    jay
  3. Best answer
    Deathcage said:
    parthtrivedi said:
    Im afraid you will have to tweak them settings in the BIOS. not exactly overclocking.


    Getting the Trident X modules in and running at 2400MHz was as simple as point-and-click, with most of the secondary settings on auto. Tweaking them higher than 2400MHz was fairly simple with the timings relaxed. 2500MHz at 11-13-13-35 with the default 1.65 volts was possible, but try as I might, 2600MHz was a no go. Voltages of up to 1.75v would allow the modules to boot and POST, but fail as soon as a load was applied. Since 2600MHz was out, the challenge was to see where the modules could be tweaked and how they would respond. The maximum clock speed for this set was right over 2500MHz using latencies of 10-12-13-35 with an applied 1.72v. Adjusting the memory controller voltage to just under 1.10v was needed, along with the higher applied vdimm. At just over 100MHz, the gains were not huge, but the modules do show potential. With a $99 price tag, you can have modules that reach over 2400MHz — something not seen lately, as higher speed bins usually come with a hefty price premium.

    ----- source
    http://www.overclockersclub.com/reviews/gskill_trident_x/3.htm


    Hi,

    Thanks for your reply.

    Its costing me about AUD$230 for the 16gb ram @2400mhz. Do you recon it would be better to get a lower speed and then try tweaking it to get higher speeds? is it safe in the long run for the memory?

    jay



    Hey Jay sorry I took a bit too long to reply, wasn't keeping well.

    That price is okay. Its similar here in India, but to be honest you wouldn't require higher rated RAM for gaming purposes.

    You can buy a low speed RAM and tweak it to run at a higher speed by relaxing the timings ( this will reduce the lifespan of the product)

    But once again I say the RAM speed is a very trivial factor for gaming purposes and I would recommend you to save that money and spend it on something else and get a 1866 Mhz RAM

    Hope this helps you in taking your decision.
    Do keep us informed
    Parth T
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