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1000-1100 Dollar Gaming PC, First Build (Need Some Help)

Hello everyone, I need help with my build in progress.
I currently have the GPU, the CPU, the OS, the case
I need a motherboard, PSU, and the RAM (would like to get 8gb)
Would like recommendations and suggestions to the build currently

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/K63hdC <-----Link to current build

Please leave reason, comparison, or explanations for your recommendations, Thanks for the help in advance!
13 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about 1000 1100 dollar gaming build
  1. Are you planning to OC or SLI in the future? That determines the type of motherboard you should get. In general, you can just settle for an GIGABYTE Z97X-Gaming 3 MOBO. That's the one I have and it has an adequate amount of expansion slots, as well as overclock and SLI support. If that's too expensive you can go for a ASRock Z97 Pro4 ATX Mobo. It supports overclock but I don't think you can have more than one video card with that mobo.
    Didn't do too much research on my Mobos but I just recently got a computer very similar to yours and I haven't had any problems yet.
    As for the PSU, you want a very reliable one with either Bronze of Gold Certified efficiency to make sure that you're getting everything out of your PSU. 600w should be more than enough but I would go for 750w just to absolutely future proof your computer, just in case you want to upgrade the video card or add another one. I recommend the Corsair CS750M PSU. It's modular and it's gold certified. It should serve you well and is priced under 100 bucks, prime eligible.
    For ram you can either get two 4gb cards or two 8gb cards (16gb total). I recommend the G.Skill RIPJAW series 8GB (2X4 gb) SDRAM DDR3 1600. It has outstanding reviews and is reasonably priced. For solid RAM sticks.
    If you get those things, we would literally have the exact same computers other than the case.
    I also did quite a bit of research on monitors and keyboards, mouses, and headsets, even mousepads lol. If you have any more questions, I'll try to answer as best I can. For all the PC veterans out there, don't crucify me, I'm just offering my opinion based on the research I've done. If I've been misinformed, let me know. Thank you :D
  2. Best answer
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4690K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($28.75 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z97 EXTREME4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($125.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($79.98 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.85 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 970 4GB WINDFORCE Video Card ($359.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Corsair 230T Windowed-BLUE ATX Mid Tower Case ($74.99 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: Antec HCG M 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($14.98 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $1107.48
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-01-06 18:59 EST-0500
    I'd go for something like this.

    -Motherboard is SLI capable for future upgrades. Asrock is amazing for price/performance, it won Tom's Z97 motherboard price/performance tests. See chart below.
    -CPU cooler, a basic one, you won't break any OC records with it, but it is probably the most recommended cooler on this site
    -PSU, very high quality, and enough watts in case you want to SLI in the future. Made by Seasonic.
    -If you KNOW you'll never SLI, you could downgrade the motherboard / PSU and then maybe get an SSD. Personally I'd stay with the above, and add an SSD in the future so that I have the option for SLI at some point.

  3. jimthenagual said:
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4690K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($28.75 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z97 EXTREME4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($125.98 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($71.97 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.85 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 970 4GB WINDFORCE Video Card ($359.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Corsair 230T Windowed-BLUE ATX Mid Tower Case ($74.99 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: Antec HCG M 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($14.98 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $1099.47
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-01-06 18:54 EST-0500

    I'd go for something like this.

    -Motherboard is SLI capable for future upgrades. Asrock is amazing for price/performance, it won Tom's Z97 motherboard price/performance tests. See chart below.
    -CPU cooler, a basic one, you won't break any OC records with it, but it is probably the most recommended cooler on this site
    -Gave you an SSD. Once you've had one you'll never want a system without one
    -PSU, very high quality, and enough watts in case you want to SLI in the future



    You didn't include Memory, so that's out of his budget. Take out the SSD for now, he doesn't need it nor does his budget allow it.
  4. jimthenagual said:
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4690K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($28.75 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z97 EXTREME4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($125.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($79.98 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.85 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 970 4GB WINDFORCE Video Card ($359.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Corsair 230T Windowed-BLUE ATX Mid Tower Case ($74.99 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: Antec HCG M 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($14.98 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $1107.48
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-01-06 18:59 EST-0500
    I'd go for something like this.

    -Motherboard is SLI capable for future upgrades. Asrock is amazing for price/performance, it won Tom's Z97 motherboard price/performance tests. See chart below.
    -CPU cooler, a basic one, you won't break any OC records with it, but it is probably the most recommended cooler on this site
    -PSU, very high quality, and enough watts in case you want to SLI in the future



    There you go :)
    Very solid build Jim.
    Cake, this is pretty much the best thing you can get within your range.
  5. edweennguyen said:

    You didn't include Memory, so that's out of his budget. Take out the SSD for now, he doesn't need it nor does his budget allow it.

    One step ahead of you on the edit :D
  6. jimthenagual said:
    edweennguyen said:

    You didn't include Memory, so that's out of his budget. Take out the SSD for now, he doesn't need it nor does his budget allow it.

    One step ahead of you lol



    :p
  7. When you say I currently have, do you mean you already bought the parts or you have made the selections you want? Only reason I say that is the EVGA 970 ACX 2.0 model is less expensive, has an almost identical clock speed and in my opinion better reliability than the Gigabyte series (I am using their 770 4GB ACX 2.0 series and it's great) but that is just my opinion. If you have bought the parts, which I am betting you have, here's my recommended parts:

    http://pcpartpicker.com/p/CFvTVn

    All should be compatible with your other components.

    ASRock's Z97 PRO4 is the best bang for your buck in terms of quality and feature-set for your 4690k, though I personally usually pick ASUS motherboards (I like their sabertooth series) with an extended warranty because things happen over the course of 5 years and it's nice knowing I can send it back to them for replacement without any hassle.

    Corsair's XMS3 is a great all around kit - it isn't overly flashy so it won't clash with any color theme (I know - I only mention it because there are people out there that care about that), their fairly low profile so you know have to worry about a large CPU cooler taking out a few DIMM slots on either side because your memory's heatsinks are obnoxiously tall and they're reliable (have been using 2 of these kits in my desktop for 2 years without a hiccup). There are less expensive options out that that are still solid performers like GSkill's Ripjaws and there are plenty of "check out my RAM" kits with flashy paint and heatsinks that look like blades, but I think the XMS3's are the best for the money and overall utility purposes.

    Most people agree that 2 of the most popular and reliable brands for power supplies on the market (except the low-end garbage CX series) are SeaSonic and Corsair. Corsair typically is the less expensive of the two - your rig likely won't need more than 550W even with your case fans, CPU fan, GPU and drives running smoothly but I prefer to always have a little extra power in case you decide to SLI down the road. Corsair's Professional Series PSU's are an affordable "I don't want to have to replace this" part. It's not fully modular, but it's got several connections that you can remove if you don't need them which is nice to keep your case tidy.

    I know you didn't ask for a CPU Fan but if you're getting a K-series chip, you will want to have the option to overclock that chip down the road when game developers actually find a way to properly use a quad core. The Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo and Plus are inexpensive but effective options to keep from frying your processor if you decide to kick up the clock rate a notch or two.

    That's my two cents...
  8. game junky said:
    When you say I currently have, do you mean you already bought the parts or you have made the selections you want? Only reason I say that is the EVGA 970 ACX 2.0 model is less expensive, has an almost identical clock speed and in my opinion better reliability than the Gigabyte series (I am using their 770 4GB ACX 2.0 series and it's great) but that is just my opinion. If you have bought the parts, which I am betting you have, here's my recommended parts:

    http://pcpartpicker.com/p/CFvTVn

    All should be compatible with your other components.

    ASRock's Z97 PRO4 is the best bang for your buck in terms of quality and feature-set for your 4690k, though I personally usually pick ASUS motherboards (I like their sabertooth series) with an extended warranty because things happen over the course of 5 years and it's nice knowing I can send it back to them for replacement without any hassle.

    Corsair's XMS3 is a great all around kit - it isn't overly flashy so it won't clash with any color theme (I know - I only mention it because there are people out there that care about that), their fairly low profile so you know have to worry about a large CPU cooler taking out a few DIMM slots on either side because your memory's heatsinks are obnoxiously tall and they're reliable (have been using 2 of these kits in my desktop for 2 years without a hiccup). There are less expensive options out that that are still solid performers like GSkill's Ripjaws and there are plenty of "check out my RAM" kits with flashy paint and heatsinks that look like blades, but I think the XMS3's are the best for the money and overall utility purposes.

    Most people agree that 2 of the most popular and reliable brands for power supplies on the market (except the low-end garbage CX series) are SeaSonic and Corsair. Corsair typically is the less expensive of the two - your rig likely won't need more than 550W even with your case fans, CPU fan, GPU and drives running smoothly but I prefer to always have a little extra power in case you decide to SLI down the road. Corsair's Professional Series PSU's are an affordable "I don't want to have to replace this" part. It's not fully modular, but it's got several connections that you can remove if you don't need them which is nice to keep your case tidy.

    I know you didn't ask for a CPU Fan but if you're getting a K-series chip, you will want to have the option to overclock that chip down the road when game developers actually find a way to properly use a quad core. The Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo and Plus are inexpensive but effective options to keep from frying your processor if you decide to kick up the clock rate a notch or two.

    That's my two cents...


    Hey dude, I'm planning on switching out my garbage PSU with a new one. I'm looking for a 750w one and I was interested in getting the Corsair CS750M, do you think that's a good choice or are there better ones? Keep in mind that I don't want to spend over 120 on a new PSU.
  9. game junky said:
    I prefer to always have a little extra power in case you decide to SLI down the road. .


    The motherboard you have chosen does not support SLI though.
  10. CS is a good buy - it has the same benefits of the HX series. (I had a buddy that fried 2 of the CX series, 1 while he was almost done submitting his taxes, before going to the CS series). CX is their budget model and it seems like they blow a rail under a surge pretty easily and they're not as energy efficient, the CS and the HX series look almost identical spec-wise but the HX models have a 7 year warranty vs a 5 year warranty. I have a power-hungry AMD chip and want to throw in another 770 down the road so I went with their 850W model - never had a problem and the packaging made me feel like I had bought something fragile and expensive. For people who don't mind spending a little extra, SeaSonic are probably the most reliable and stable power supplies on the market. You pay for that reliability but you get what you pay for like most Intel products.
  11. jimthenagual said:
    game junky said:
    I prefer to always have a little extra power in case you decide to SLI down the road. .


    The motherboard you have chosen does not support SLI though.


    You're right...good catch - I was looking at the Extreme4 when I spec'd, it does but the PRO4 only has a single PCIE 3.0 instead of a 2.0.
  12. jimthenagual said:
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4690K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($28.75 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z97 EXTREME4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($125.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($79.98 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.85 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 970 4GB WINDFORCE Video Card ($359.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Corsair 230T Windowed-BLUE ATX Mid Tower Case ($74.99 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: Antec HCG M 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($14.98 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $1107.48
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2015-01-06 18:59 EST-0500
    I'd go for something like this.

    -Motherboard is SLI capable for future upgrades. Asrock is amazing for price/performance, it won Tom's Z97 motherboard price/performance tests. See chart below.
    -CPU cooler, a basic one, you won't break any OC records with it, but it is probably the most recommended cooler on this site
    -PSU, very high quality, and enough watts in case you want to SLI in the future. Made by Seasonic.
    -If you KNOW you'll never SLI, you could downgrade the motherboard / PSU and then maybe get an SSD. Personally I'd stay with the above, and add an SSD in the future so that I have the option for SLI at some point.



    Omg, I am loving this build! I am probably gonna drop the country fan for now, probably not going to touch over clocking for a while, but I will pick one up if I plan to do it in the future. I know a SSD is a really nice addition, probably will wait until one goes on sale before I pick one up. I like getting the more powerful supply if I do end up going the SLI route. thanks for this amazing suggestion!
  13. When you do get an SSD, look at the pricing on Samsung's 840 or 850 EVO series - best combination of price, performance and reliability on the market. I deploy a lot of these for work and have yet to have a failure.
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