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The H97 doesn't support overclocking.

The H97 chipset doesn't support overclocking, but why is this :
http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/ASUS-H97-PRO-GAMER-Motherboard/1866/6
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More about h97 support overclocking
  1. They'll have used a BIOS update, possibly an unofficial one, to enable OCing - there's a fair bit of this around at the mo, to enable OCing on the new super-cheap-and-OCable Anniversary Edition Pentium (otherwise you have to hVE an expensive board to OC a cheap chip, making the saving in buying the chip pointless)
  2. On this site too, they've said there are options to increase CPU multiplier but H97 is not geared towards overclocking. Can I overclock with extreme care without suffering damage? refer this link; under conclusion, second paragraph, mid third line: http://www.overclock3d.net/reviews/cpu_mainboard/asus_h97_pro_gamer_motherboard/1
  3. Not entirely pointless. ASRock did release three motherboards called the Anniversary editions. They are made for that Pentium. They offer b85, h97, and z97. They are missing a lot of features that their regular boards have, so they are much cheaper. I think the Z97 is only $80, versus the usual $100+ for a Z97. The other two are much cheaper.
  4. Wheather its supported in the BIOS or not, overclocking a CPU requires VOLTAGE increases. These increases put stress on VRMs, low cost boards have either smaller VRM design or lacking VRM cooling.

    MILD overclocking is fine on these boards, but generally a bad idea if you are doing it on an I5 or I7 due to their higher power threshold compared to the Pentium G3258.
  5. Novuake said:
    Wheather its supported in the BIOS or not, overclocking a CPU requires VOLTAGE increases. These increases put stress on VRMs, low cost boards have either smaller VRM design or lacking VRM cooling.

    MILD overclocking is fine on these boards, but generally a bad idea if you are doing it on an I5 or I7 due to their higher power threshold compared to the Pentium G3258.


    What exactly high power threshold means here?
  6. Best answer
    To overclock 1 core requires X amount of extra voltage application.

    To overclock 2 cores to the same speed requires X multiplied by 2 voltage.
    So the VRMs need to be able to A. stably hand that power. B. Cool good enough to handle it.

    This isn't exact maths, but it should illustrate my point.
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