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PC wont do normal windows boot. Stuck in bootloop...

I powered my laptop this morning (HP Pavilion g6-2399sa Notebook) and to my surprise, my PC stayed in bootloop for a couple hours until I did a hard shutdown/reset. I tried booting again and this time, I was a bit successful in being able to log in. Upon login, I realised that my computer was extremely slow and I was logged in to a temporary account. I tried running "sfc /scannow" and "Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth" but It didn't work. I was returned and error. I restarted but then I went back to boot loop. I tried system restore and I got the error " System Restore did not complete successfully. Your computer's system files and settings were not changed.
Details:
System restore failed while scanning the file system on the drive C:\ the drive might be corrupted. you might want to retry system restore after running chkdsk /R on this disk
An unspecified error occurred during system restore (0x8007045d)."
Since then I have tried logging back in and I came up unsuccessful every-time.
I suspect my hard drive has some errors. But i didn't make any changes to anything recently really.
If any additional information is require I will gladly provide.
Please help my solve this issue in the most convenient time possible. I have really important files I cannot lose and I also use my computer for work..
Thank you in advance.
7 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about wont normal windows boot stuck bootloop
  1. Try to restart PC in safe mode or safe mode with networking, remove any AV software if it is there. Do a check disk and sfc scan on safemode. Also uncheck restart computer during error in system properties advanced settings under startup and recovery
  2. Looks highly likely your drive has developed bad sectors. If I were you and the disk contains valuable info I would remove it as quickly as possible. Quickest would be to boot your machine with Linux and access the data to move to an external drive, or remove the drive completely and use a USB caddy to copy the data to another PC.
    Unless you created a Recovery drive you will need Recovery disks from HP to restore your system on a new Drive. (Assuming W8 came pre-installed)
    http://www.techsupportforum.com/forums/f64/how-to-use-ubuntu-superos-to-recover-files-from-windows-465370.html
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_trksid=p2047675.m570.l1311.R3.TR11.TRC1.A0.H2.XUSB+Caddy&_nkw=2.5+sata+to+usb+hard+drive+caddy&_sacat=0&_from=R40
  3. dodger46 said:
    Looks highly likely your drive has developed bad sectors. If I were you and the disk contains valuable info I would remove it as quickly as possible. Quickest would be to boot your machine with Linux and access the data to move to an external drive, or remove the drive completely and use a USB caddy to copy the data to another PC.
    Unless you created a Recovery drive you will need Recovery disks from HP to restore your system on a new Drive. (Assuming W8 came pre-installed)
    http://www.techsupportforum.com/forums/f64/how-to-use-ubuntu-superos-to-recover-files-from-windows-465370.html
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_trksid=p2047675.m570.l1311.R3.TR11.TRC1.A0.H2.XUSB+Caddy&_nkw=2.5+sata+to+usb+hard+drive+caddy&_sacat=0&_from=R40


    Have successfully copied all my files over to an external.
  4. Rams Anirudh said:
    Try to restart PC in safe mode or safe mode with networking, remove any AV software if it is there. Do a check disk and sfc scan on safemode. Also uncheck restart computer during error in system properties advanced settings under startup and recovery


    I tried previously, but it yield nothing new.. The same when tried.

    This is the results from CHKDSK

    Chkdsk was executed in scan mode on a volume snapshot.

    Checking file system on C:
    Volume label is ZOOTEE.

    Stage 1: Examining basic file system structure ...

    451840 file records processed. File verification completed.

    4579 large file records processed.
    0 bad file records processed.
    Stage 2: Examining file name linkage ...

    542596 index entries processed. Index verification completed.

    Stage 3: Examining security descriptors ...
    Security descriptor verification completed.

    45379 data files processed. CHKDSK is verifying Usn Journal...

    37209344 USN bytes processed. Usn Journal verification completed.

    Windows has scanned the file system and found no problems.
    No further action is required.

    950935551 KB total disk space.
    534414488 KB in 338563 files.
    183756 KB in 45380 indexes.
    586663 KB in use by the system.
    65536 KB occupied by the log file.
    415750644 KB available on disk.

    4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
    237733887 total allocation units on disk.
    103937661 allocation units available on disk.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------


    Stage 1: Examining basic file system structure ...

    Stage 2: Examining file name linkage ...

    Stage 3: Examining security descriptors ...

    Windows has scanned the file system and found no problems.
    No further action is required.
  5. Best answer
    So, I got my system back up and running with some really intense

    thinking, research and application.

    Here was the process I underwent:

    I booted up in safe mode w/ networking. After backing-up all my

    information, I firstly removed my Norton 360 AV with the "Norton

    Removal Tool", I then went into the C: folder. I realised there

    were two strange folders named "$WINDOWS.~BT" and ".Trash-999"

    respectively. I used disk clean-up to remove "$WINDOWS.~BT" and

    for ".Trash-999", a method I learned when I was removing cygwin.

    I'll share it:

    First I navigated to the C: drive where the ".Trash-999" folder

    was located.
    ===
    This command takes ownership recursive of the folder, without

    asking anything:
    ===
    takeown /r /d y /f .Trash-999

    ===
    This command gives Full Access to Everyone recursively in the

    folder:
    ===
    icacls .Trash-999 /t /grant Everyone:F

    ===
    And finally, the command which deletes it all and removes

    .Trash-999:
    ===
    rmdir /s /q .Trash-999

    I then logged in to my "Normal" account, made sure the service

    "wuauserv" was running with the command "net start wuauserv" and

    then that the internet was working by using the web browser.

    Moreover, I ran "DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth" from

    an elevated prompt. After a successfully completed restore

    operation, I subsequently ran "sfc /scannow" to repair system

    files. Upon 100% completion, the scan returned "Windows Resource

    Protection did not find any integrity violations." I did a reboot

    and Waah-laah. That its. Back up and running


    Thanks for the replies It helped too.
  6. I'm guessing that your windows 8 install was an upgrade and that you've dabbled with Linux in the past on this machine? This would account for the $Windows.~BT and the Trash-999 folders, and if they were indeed causing your system problems then these problems were probably unique to your rig. Full marks for sorting it out, deserves a 'Pick as Solution' who knows, someone might benefit with a similar problem...
    (I suspect the removal of Norton might have helped, too!)
  7. dodger46 said:
    I'm guessing that your windows 8 install was an upgrade and that you've dabbled with Linux in the past on this machine? This would account for the $Windows.~BT and the Trash-999 folders, and if they were indeed causing your system problems then these problems were probably unique to your rig. Full marks for sorting it out, deserves a 'Pick as Solution' who knows, someone might benefit with a similar problem...
    (I suspect the removal of Norton might have helped, too!)


    It certainly does. Yes I dabbled with Linux when I realised that Windows was giving problems.
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