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Need Help with second HDD not showing correctly.

Hello, I have 2 hard drives, one with linux that came with the PC and the other one with Windows that was my old one, for start up the Windows one launches but I can't seem to find the other hard drive, instead it is listed in the CD Drive section. And when I go onto starting with the linux hard drive, I can only see the linux drive and not the windows, I believe this is because they're in different formats. However, I tried a lot of things especially in Disk Managment and Command Prompt to reformat this drive, it was not successful. Also I checked in the Device Manager, and its also categorized as a cd drive. Any help would be gladly appreciated. Thanks.
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  1. Windows will not see your Linux drive unless you add third party software which is somewhat hit or miss in functionality.

    Linux can see windows however and in most newer versions it should show up automatically. If you please tell me what linux you have and we fix whatever is the problem.
  2. stillblue said:
    Windows will not see your Linux drive unless you add third party software which is somewhat hit or miss in functionality.

    Linux can see windows however and in most newer versions it should show up automatically. If you please tell me what linux you have and we fix whatever is the problem.


    I have Linux Mint 13 if that's what you wanted to know
  3. go to a terminal and type sudo fdisk -l
  4. Electricity is somewhat hit or miss for me right now. Just in case. Assuming you find the disk using fdisk then go ahead and install pysdm which will give you a gui for managing the disks. sudo apt-get install pysdm then sudo pysdm
  5. stillblue said:
    Electricity is somewhat hit or miss for me right now. Just in case. Assuming you find the disk using fdisk then go ahead and install pysdm which will give you a gui for managing the disks. sudo apt-get install pysdm then sudo pysdm


    I have install psydm it lists two partitions: sda1 which is a ext4 type and sda5 which is a swap.
    For the fdisk, i got these results:
    Disk /dev/sda: 80.0 GB, 80000000000 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9726 cylinders, total 156250000 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x000734ab

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 2048 148013055 74005504 83 Linux
    /dev/sda2 148015102 156248063 4116481 5 Extended
    /dev/sda5 148015104 156248063 4116480 82 Linux swap / Solaris

    Now what do I do next?
  6. Are both disks connected? fdisk -l should have given you /dev/sda and /dev/sdb. sda is the drive you have booted and sdb the other.
  7. stillblue said:
    Are both disks connected? fdisk -l should have given you /dev/sda and /dev/sdb. sda is the drive you have booted and sdb the other.


    Well both are connected but there is a second wire, and if its plugged into the linux hard drive, the linux one gets booted up, and when its plugged into the windows hard drive, the windows boots up, and linux is shown as a CD drive and is not accessible.
  8. OK. There should be two cables connected to the disks assuming they are SATA. One is for power the other, smaller one, is for data. You need another cable like this http://www.amazon.com/Monoprice-18-Inch-Locking-90-Degree-108783/dp/B009GUXU52/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1397735796&sr=8-2&keywords=data+cable+hard+drive . If you look at your motherboard and follow the existing cable you'll see another place right next to it to plug in a second one. Be sure and do this while the computer is unplugged.
  9. stillblue said:
    OK. There should be two cables connected to the disks assuming they are SATA. One is for power the other, smaller one, is for data. You need another cable like this http://www.amazon.com/Monoprice-18-Inch-Locking-90-Degree-108783/dp/B009GUXU52/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1397735796&sr=8-2&keywords=data+cable+hard+drive . If you look at your motherboard and follow the existing cable you'll see another place right next to it to plug in a second one. Be sure and do this while the computer is unplugged.


    Ahh I see now thanks, well the one next to it is plugged to the cd drive, but I see another slot for it a bit further down, will that work?
  10. Yep, if you want you can use the cable from the cd/dvd to test it out if it is long enough.
  11. stillblue said:
    Yep, if you want you can use the cable from the cd/dvd to test it out if it is long enough.


    Hold on, i found some spare ones from my other computer the colour is red, does that matter?
  12. stillblue said:
    Yep, if you want you can use the cable from the cd/dvd to test it out if it is long enough.


    Now the hard drive is recognised and I can access it through linux, but how do I start up to windows now or do whatever I need to do next?
  13. Can't imagine why it would. Remember, Windows still won't see Linux. Also, see if your bios will allow you to boot to the Linux drive since it's a simple thing to add windows to the linux boot loader. From a terminal in linux type sudo update-grub. Not to worry if you can't, we'll walk you though it.
  14. I need to learn to type faster. From a terminal type sudo update-grub
  15. stillblue said:
    I need to learn to type faster. From a terminal type sudo update-grub


    Alright so it found windows 7 now
  16. Best answer
    You're good to go. Next boot you'll be presented with a list of options one being linux and another windows. you navigate with your arrow keys. If you make no choice in 10 seconds it'll default to Linux. The defaul can be changed if you need.
  17. stillblue said:
    You're good to go. Next boot you'll be presented with a list of options one being linux and another windows. you navigate with your arrow keys. If you make no choice in 10 seconds it'll default to Linux. The defaul can be changed if you need.


    Alright, now one more request, is there a way I can format the linux hard drive so that it's accessible in windows?
  18. Windows can't see linux. So your best option is to create a data folder on the windows drive and keep anything you want accessible to both there. Or better still is a new NTFS partition on either drive to store data in. The big advantage to a storage partition is that your data is safer when you do new installs, no need to displace it.
  19. stillblue said:
    Windows can't see linux. So your best option is to create a data folder on the windows drive and keep anything you want accessible to both there. Or better still is a new NTFS partition on either drive to store data in. The big advantage to a storage partition is that your data is safer when you do new installs, no need to displace it.


    So is there a way I can get rid of this linux completely to create an NTFS partition, because I do not need Linux anymore
  20. stillblue said:
    Windows can't see linux. So your best option is to create a data folder on the windows drive and keep anything you want accessible to both there. Or better still is a new NTFS partition on either drive to store data in. The big advantage to a storage partition is that your data is safer when you do new installs, no need to displace it.


    There is a problem, when I try to boot up windows i get this error:

    error: no such device: B86426E66426A75A
    error: hd1 cannot get C/H/S values.

    Press any key to continue...

    and then it goes back to the boot selection thingy
  21. Simply reformat the drive. You can do that by booting to your linux install media and use gparted. Or any myriad of other boot disks out there. Ultimate boot cd comes to mind.
  22. stillblue said:
    Simply reformat the drive. You can do that by booting to your linux install media and use gparted. Or any myriad of other boot disks out there. Ultimate boot cd comes to mind.


    And what is this linux install media? Sorry but this is really confusing me
  23. You can't format a drive that you are booted to. So the linux drive is out if you want to format that drive. Windows isn't smart enough to see linux drive. Therefore you need to use a bootable USB or DVD like what you used to install Linux or another bootable disk like UBCD.
  24. stillblue said:
    You can't format a drive that you are booted to. So the linux drive is out if you want to format that drive. Windows isn't smart enough to see linux drive. Therefore you need to use a bootable USB or DVD like what you used to install Linux or another bootable disk like UBCD.


    So if I have a linux bootable on my usb, I will be able to format my linux hard drive?
  25. Absolutely, but why would you want to? It's true that as people use Linux they start to question why they pay money for Windows and anti-viruses. Do not fear abandoning Windows by becoming comfortable with Linux, Bill Gates isn't going to go hungry any time soon.

    The program is gparted and comes pretty much standard with Linux systems.
  26. stillblue said:
    Absolutely, but why would you want to? It's true that as people use Linux they start to question why they pay money for Windows and anti-viruses. Do not fear abandoning Windows by becoming comfortable with Linux, Bill Gates isn't going to go hungry any time soon.

    The program is gparted and comes pretty much standard with Linux systems.



    It's just the fact I've been with Windows for so long now, it'll be a big change going to linux, besides, doesn't Windows have more compatibilities (unless it comes to hard drives). For example executables, most games are only on Mac and Windows, if they were on Linux I wouldn't mind using it.
  27. Dominik H said:
    stillblue said:
    Absolutely, but why would you want to? It's true that as people use Linux they start to question why they pay money for Windows and anti-viruses. Do not fear abandoning Windows by becoming comfortable with Linux, Bill Gates isn't going to go hungry any time soon.

    The program is gparted and comes pretty much standard with Linux systems.



    It's just the fact I've been with Windows for so long now, it'll be a big change going to linux, besides, doesn't Windows have more compatibilities (unless it comes to hard drives). For example executables, most games are only on Mac and Windows, if they were on Linux I wouldn't mind using it.


    The learning curve between XP and 8 is much higher than the learning curve to Ubuntu or Mint.
    Hardware is rapidly becoming a non-issue because manufacturers are eyeing that when you include Android the majority of devices today are running linux. That can't be overlooked.

    Games. Absolutely, windows rules there but again, that's changing, just not as fast. All new Steam products, including their new device, run on Linux. So keep your dual boot. Play on windows work on Linux.
  28. stillblue said:
    Dominik H said:
    stillblue said:
    Absolutely, but why would you want to? It's true that as people use Linux they start to question why they pay money for Windows and anti-viruses. Do not fear abandoning Windows by becoming comfortable with Linux, Bill Gates isn't going to go hungry any time soon.

    The program is gparted and comes pretty much standard with Linux systems.



    It's just the fact I've been with Windows for so long now, it'll be a big change going to linux, besides, doesn't Windows have more compatibilities (unless it comes to hard drives). For example executables, most games are only on Mac and Windows, if they were on Linux I wouldn't mind using it.


    The learning curve between XP and 8 is much higher than the learning curve to Ubuntu or Mint.
    Hardware is rapidly becoming a non-issue because manufacturers are eyeing that when you include Android the majority of devices today are running linux. That can't be overlooked.

    Games. Absolutely, windows rules there but again, that's changing, just not as fast. All new Steam products, including their new device, run on Linux. So keep your dual boot. Play on windows work on Linux.


    I guess that would be the best to do. I really appreciate your help, thank you very much, sir.
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