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Safe temps for an overclocked 3570k?

Hey guys, I was just wondering what should be considered my "safe limit" when running prime95 blend with this cpu overclocked. Right now its at 4.2 ghz with a hyper 212 evo, and real temp is showing me results that make me a bit nervous while running prime95 and seeing what the max temp that one of my cores reached is. But anyway, what would be the temperature that each individual core should not exceed while running the blend test? Thanks in advance to all :D
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More about safe temps overclocked 3570k
  1. 60s would be ideal, but you're still safe in the 70s, but you wouldn't want 24/7 use in the 70s. 80+ is a different story though...
  2. fatboytyler said:
    60s would be ideal, but you're still safe in the 70s, but you wouldn't want 24/7 use in the 70s. 80+ is a different story though...


    Yeah, what scares me is that one of my cores is always a little hotter than the rest, and real temp said that its highest temperature climbed above 80 degrees Celsius. That being said though, it was the HIGHEST recorded temperature that that particular core climbed to, but still, worries me. The other cores highest temps were still a little below 80 degrees Celsius. As a package, i'm not sure what the average was, but I was only running prime95 for about half an hour.
  3. Keep it in the 60s 24/7. You can go much higher for short periods, but if your 24/7 is under 73, you're golden.
  4. Best answer
    YOu will have cores hotter than others. Typically Cores 0/1 or 1/2 depending on how your sensors read them usually run hotter than the other two. So a PEAK at 80 or right above is fine. As stated, you don't want those to be your 24/7 temps. So for gaming, if you do game, it would be fine since there are no games that are going to 100% the CPU the whole time. My 3570k Peaks at real low 80s while running Small FFTs in Prime95.
  5. Any temperature below the thermal throttling temperature is a safe temperature and that doesn't happen until 105C on a Core i5-3570K. If this was hurting your CPU, why did Intel increase the thermal throttling temperature from 98C to 105C when they went from Sandy Bridge to Ivy Bridge? People worry way too much about their CPU temperature when there is no reason to do this. Intel CPUs have always done a great job of thermal management.

    As for core temps being slightly different, this is usually just random sensor error. These temperature sensors only purpose is to control thermal throttling and thermal shutdown. Intel didn't need to use 100% accurate space shuttle quality sensors for this so they didn't. Providing enthusiasts with 100% accurate core temperatures was never the design goal. These sensor are accurate to +/- 5C and that's at the calibration point. Below that where most people run their CPUs the amount of error can be greater and the amount of variation core to core will also be greater unless all 4 cores are running the exact same code.

    Intel designs their CPUs so they can run reliably, 24/7, in poorly maintained servers with CPU coolers packed full of dust. Some people treat CPUs like they were delicate old ladies. An Intel CPU can take more abuse than you can imagine and do this while being completely stable. I wish all computer parts were built to the same standard.

    http://img27.imageshack.us/img27/6216/torturetest.png
  6. unclewebb said:
    Any temperature below the thermal throttling temperature is a safe temperature and that doesn't happen until 105C on a Core i5-3570K. If this was hurting your CPU, why did Intel increase the thermal throttling temperature from 98C to 105C when they went from Sandy Bridge to Ivy Bridge? People worry way too much about their CPU temperature when there is no reason to do this. Intel CPUs have always done a great job of thermal management.

    As for core temps being slightly different, this is usually just random sensor error. These temperature sensors only purpose is to control thermal throttling and thermal shutdown. Intel didn't need to use 100% accurate space shuttle quality sensors for this so they didn't. Providing enthusiasts with 100% accurate core temperatures was never the design goal. These sensor are accurate to +/- 5C and that's at the calibration point. Below that where most people run their CPUs the amount of error can be greater and the amount of variation core to core will also be greater unless all 4 cores are running the exact same code.

    Intel designs their CPUs so they can run reliably, 24/7, in poorly maintained servers with CPU coolers packed full of dust. Some people treat CPUs like they were delicate old ladies. An Intel CPU can take more abuse than you can imagine and do this while being completely stable. I wish all computer parts were built to the same standard.

    http://img27.imageshack.us/img27/6216/torturetest.png


    RUnning it like this though will significantly shorten the life span of the CPU. Since most people can't drop another $220 into a CPU anytime its best to keep it within ranges that aren't going to shave months off the life time.
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