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Supposed Intel i7-3770K vs. i7-4770K Benchmarks Leaked

By - Source: Coolaler Forums | B 2 comments

Some Benchmarks have been leaked where the i7-3770K has been pitted against the upcoming i7-4770K.

A user over at the Coolaler forums has leaked some benchmarks of the Core i7-4770K; it compares them against what we're most interested in, its predecessor, the i7-3770K.

The i7-4770K will be a quad-core part with HyperThreading, resulting in eight threads. It will have a base clock frequency of 3.5 GHz and a boost clock of 3.9 GHz. There will be 8 MB of cache, HD 4600 "GT2" graphics iGPU, and a Thermal Design Power (TDP) of 84 Watts, seven more than the current i7-3770K. Earlier, it was leaked that the chip would cost about $327.

While the benchmarks aren't necessarily reliable, based on the rumors regarding Haswell's performance, they do not seem out of line. It remains a leak though, so do take it all with a grain of salt.

CPUMark99:

  • Core i7-3770K: 613 Points
  • Core i7-4770K: 676 Points

SuperPI 1M:

  • Core i7-3770K: 9.344 Seconds
  • Core i7-4770K: 9.220 Seconds
SuperPI 32M:
  • Core i7-3770K: 8:38.717 Minutes
  • Core i7-4770K: 8:15.059 Minutes
Cinebench R11.5
  • Core i7-3770K: 7.87 Points
  • Core i7-4770K: 8.55 Points
 
Overall, we can see that the CPU shows an increase in performance between 5 and 10 percent. Again, following the rumors from earlier, this doesn't come as a massive surprise. It mainly verifies what we already knew.

Coolaler also mentioned that, while Haswell will be very nice for overclocking, it still suffers from the same temperature problems that Ivy Bridge does, although perhaps not to as great an extent.


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  • 0 Hide
    griptwister , 26 April 2013 22:45
    I'd be surprised if those were real. Seems like a bit much for a supposed 10% Improvement.
  • 0 Hide
    dizzy_davidh , 27 April 2013 05:01
    There comes a point where, for consumers at least, the law of diminishing returns comes into play in that the additional cost of such a processor (and associated motherboard etc. when a different slot\socket is employed) for the type of gains seen is just not worth it.
    For those that have mission-critical speed concerns it becomes more worth the while but otherwise the average consumer really has to skip a few generations\speed iterations to not be constantly wasting their money on endless upgrades especially if they are a speed-head upgrading for nothing more than the bragging rights.