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Intel's Ivy Bridge Core i3 Details Leaked

By - Source: VR-Zone | B 10 comments

With Ivy Bridge set to launch in just a few months' time (April), we are now learning a little more about the specifications for the upcoming Core i3 processors.

In December, we got our first information on Ivy Bridge's specifications for its Core i7 and Core i5 processors. In a recently leaked slide coming out of website Zol.com.cn, we get an early picture of Ivy Bridge's Core i3 specifications.

Taking a look at Intel's standard Core i3 series, we start with the Core i3 3240. It has a base clock speed of 3.4 GHz with 2 cores (4 threads) with no turbo boost and a TDP of 55W. Intel has kept the cache at the same level as with Sandy Bridge, but the memory support has been bumped to 1333 and 1600MHz. The Core i3 3240 uses Intel's HD Graphics 2500, not the newer HD 4000 seen with some of other models.

Next in line is the Core i3 3225, which has a base clock speed of 3.3 GHz with 2 cores (4 threads) with no turbo boost and a TDP of 55W. As is the trend on Sandy Bridge, CPU model numbers with a 5 at the end utilize the higher-end integrated graphics. The Core i3 3225 follows the same trend with the use of Intel's HD Graphics 4000. The Core i3 3220 has the same specifications as the i3 3225 but uses Intel's HD Graphics 2500.

Next, we take a look at Intel's Core i3 T (ultra low power with 35-45W TDP) models. The Core i3 3240T has a base clock speed of 3.0 GHz with 2 cores (4 threads) with no turbo boost and a TDP of 35W. It utilizes Intel's HD Graphics 2500. The Core i-3 3220T has the same specifications as the i3 3240T but has a base clock speed of 2.80 GHz. The Core i3 T models have the cache at the same level as with Sandy Bridge, but the memory support has been bumped to 1333 and 1600MHz like with the standard Core i3 models.

All the leaked slides suggest the new Core i3 series doesn't offer PCIe Gen 3.0 support. We are not sure if the information is incomplete or if Intel has a reason behind not providing PCIe Gen 3.0 support for its new Core i3 series. Personally, I think this would a bad move (if true) by Intel for the end-user. This would mean end-users who want to build a system based on a dual-core setup with a higher-end motherboard would not have PCIe Gen 3.0 support. They would need to purchase either a Core i7 or Core i5 processor to gain PCIe Gen 3 support for their systems. Please keep in mind, of course, that these specifications are from a leaked source. We won't know for sure until Intel shares official information, so be sure to stay tuned.

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  • 0 Hide
    13thmonkey , 17 February 2012 03:58
    thats the second mention i've seen where the 2500K replacement has been in some way held back, note that both of the K series i5 and i7 have no release date.
  • 0 Hide
    technogiant , 17 February 2012 06:34
    Somethings don't seem right, first on the high powered chart they have the socket number for SB incorrect.

    Secondly I doubt that the only differentiation between the 3770K and the 3570K will be 100MHz on the base clock and 2mb of cache, doesn't seem enough difference to leverage any price differential.
  • 0 Hide
    technogiant , 17 February 2012 07:15
    Yeah, sorry visa versa...it's late ;-)
  • 0 Hide
    13thmonkey , 17 February 2012 15:15
    I think that they have hyperthreading on the 3770k but not the 3750k which is expected.
  • 0 Hide
    technogiant , 17 February 2012 15:18
    ^ I would have thought that also....but the chart shows they are both hyperthreaded.
  • 0 Hide
    13thmonkey , 17 February 2012 15:55
    ^ well i misread that, i'm settling in to a wait and see mode for both intel and the green team. too much floating about. if there is no 2500k replacement soon then i'll stick with what i've got till haswell and then i'll have skipped 2 generations, as i've got a Q9550.
  • 0 Hide
    technogiant , 17 February 2012 19:02
    Also waiting to see what's released, I'm still on Q6600 @3.6Ghz.....don't know if I can wait till Haswell.
  • 0 Hide
    13thmonkey , 17 February 2012 19:29
    I'm not feeling that my system is slow, (i'll buy a 670 if it is) but I do want to build something, i've got some friends that may want machines, so that might have to keep me going.
  • -1 Hide
    kunjar , 17 February 2012 22:37
    Stop saturating the market with bullsh1t incremental updates to processors, and spend more time in R&D to discover and then release a CPU with a major update. Stupid tech firms.
  • 0 Hide
    13thmonkey , 17 February 2012 23:21
    kunjarStop saturating the market with bullsh1t incremental updates to processors, and spend more time in R&D to discover and then release a CPU with a major update. Stupid tech firms.

    Do you not remember the jump from P4 to Core2?
    Do you want to pay 5x as much for your components, you will if they are forced to only sell them for a year.
    Do you have any actual problems with how fast your components are running right now?
    Do you remember that just a few years ago win7 and aero etc, brought many machines it their knees, now even the lowest chips cope
    What exactly is your problem, or is the hype making you want it sooner? in which case grow up.