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Budget Overclocker - AMD's Athlon 64 X2 5000+ Black Edition

Budget Overclocker - AMD's Athlon 64 X2 5000+ Black Edition
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The “Black Edition” of AMD’s Athlon 64 X2 5000+ features an unlocked multiplier. Unlike the first Black Edition model, the 90nm 6400+, the new processor is even produced on a 65nm process. As a result, it only draws about half as much power as the 6400+ and offers enormous overclocking potential. Pushed to its limit, this processor is faster than an Athlon X2 600+ or Intel’s Core 2 Duo E6550. Among today’s CPUs, this €110 processor is unique in that its performance can be increased without having to raise either the FSB or the memory frequency, making it a safe choice for any AM2 board.

Let’s get right to it: If you’re considering buying the 5000+ Black Edition, you intend to overclock it – and we mean really overclock it. If that’s not your cup of tea, you can safely choose the 5000+ EE, which comes with a locked multiplier and costs a few Euros less. Therefore, this article focuses on the processor’s performance and behavior in its overclocked state, comparing it to other current processors from AMD and Intel.

5000+ Black Edition

Of course there’s nothing to keep you from overclocking the Intel processors included for comparison here as well. However, within this article we are considering the 5000+ Black Edition primarily as a CPU upgrade for people with existing AM2 systems, meaning that Intel processors are not an option.

5000+ Black Edition5000+ Black Edition

What makes the 5000+ Black Edition especially interesting, aside from the unlocked multiplier, is that it uses the newly introduced G2 stepping. This refined processor stepping allows the processor to run stably at higher clock speeds without requiring an increase in core voltage.

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The obvious benefit: You can put an inexpensive overclocked AMD processor into your PC, and still the CPU fan won’t need to run at speeds that make it sound like a turbine. Thus, thanks to the low thermal power dissipation, you don’t need to spend extra money on a complex cooling solution.

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    THReader , 21 October 2007 12:40
    I usually don't make accounts like this. But for this review I really had to.

    TERRIBLE REVIEW, just awful. Very poorly written (several numerical mistakes) and very misleading.

    Who compares a stock E6550 to a X2 5000+ with a 1.0Ghz OC advantage?
    Worst of all, do you ever mention the E6550 is at stock? No...

    Bert, Bert, Bert...
    Don't tase my comparative analysis, bro!